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Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-04-2004, 04:25 PM
mocha
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Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle

I grew up in a dishwasherless house, and thus handwashed everything. Even
now with my own house, I've always been one to rinse off my plates/flatware
before putting them in the dishwasher for fear of food concretions requiring
a jack hammer to get off. I know the dishwasher has the rinse/hold cycle
that's supposed to do that for you, but it seems like an extra use of
electricity and water that would be a waste. Does anyone have experience
actually using this cycle, and do you feel it's a more efficient use of
resources versus doing it by hand? Thanks!

JP


Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 12-04-2004, 06:15 PM
Vox Humana
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Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle


"mocha" wrote in message
...
I grew up in a dishwasherless house, and thus handwashed everything. Even
now with my own house, I've always been one to rinse off my

plates/flatware
before putting them in the dishwasher for fear of food concretions

requiring
a jack hammer to get off. I know the dishwasher has the rinse/hold cycle
that's supposed to do that for you, but it seems like an extra use of
electricity and water that would be a waste. Does anyone have experience
actually using this cycle, and do you feel it's a more efficient use of
resources versus doing it by hand? Thanks!


Most late model dishwasher don't require that you rinse your dishes.
Generally, you can simply scrape them and put them in the dishwasher. There
are grinding mechanisms or screens that deal with the particles of food left
after scraping. You are correct that the rinse and hold cycles are a waste
of resources. However, you will probably waste more water and energy by
rinsing the dishes. I would scrape them without rinsing, and machine wash
using the appropriate cycle. After some time, you will learn what your
dishwasher won't deal with well, and for those items only, you will need to
do some pre-scrubbing. The only time that I would consider using the rinse
and hold cycle is if I don't anticipate running the dishwasher for an
extended period. That almost never happens as even with only the two of us,
I run at least one cycle a day. I see the rinse and hold cycle as a way to
reduce odors from food left on dishes for a prolonged time more than a way
to rinse the dishes prior to washing. Most dishwashers increase the number
and duration of rinse and wash cycles as you go from light, to normal, to
pots and pans. If you find the your unrinsed dishes are not being cleaned,
then you should make sure the water is hot enough, you are using fresh
dishwashing detergent, use a rinse agent, and select a longer cycle. Also,
you might have to try several brand of detergent to get one that works well
in your machine.


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 12-04-2004, 10:28 PM
Kate Dicey
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle



mocha wrote:

I grew up in a dishwasherless house, and thus handwashed everything. Even
now with my own house, I've always been one to rinse off my plates/flatware
before putting them in the dishwasher for fear of food concretions requiring
a jack hammer to get off. I know the dishwasher has the rinse/hold cycle
that's supposed to do that for you, but it seems like an extra use of
electricity and water that would be a waste. Does anyone have experience
actually using this cycle, and do you feel it's a more efficient use of
resources versus doing it by hand? Thanks!

JP



We just scrape the lumps into the bin, and wash. If stuff is cooked on,
I might soak a while first. Sometimes I use the pre-wash option, but I
don't have a rinse and hold cycle I don't think. Not something I'd look
for...
--
Kate XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 13-04-2004, 03:24 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle



"mocha" wrote in message ...
I know the dishwasher has the rinse/hold cycle
that's supposed to do that for you, but it seems like an extra use of
electricity and water that would be a waste. Does anyone have experience
actually using this cycle, and do you feel it's a more efficient use of
resources versus doing it by hand? Thanks!

JP


Used the cycle once in about 30 years of DW ownership. It is supposed to
rinse the dishes and keep them ready for the wash cycle when you finally
fill up the machine. To me, it is a waste of time.

FWIW, the machine uses less water than the typical hand wash and rinse.
Detergents today are better than they were when the R & H cycle was
invented. My guess is that the manufacturers are afraid to eliminate it
because no one want to be first to eliminate a "feature" no matter how
dubious a value it is.
Ed

http://pages.cthome.net/edhome


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 13-04-2004, 03:52 PM
Vox Humana
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle


"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message
...


"mocha" wrote in message ...
I know the dishwasher has the rinse/hold cycle
that's supposed to do that for you, but it seems like an extra use of
electricity and water that would be a waste. Does anyone have

experience
actually using this cycle, and do you feel it's a more efficient use of
resources versus doing it by hand? Thanks!

JP


Used the cycle once in about 30 years of DW ownership. It is supposed to
rinse the dishes and keep them ready for the wash cycle when you finally
fill up the machine. To me, it is a waste of time.

FWIW, the machine uses less water than the typical hand wash and rinse.
Detergents today are better than they were when the R & H cycle was
invented. My guess is that the manufacturers are afraid to eliminate it
because no one want to be first to eliminate a "feature" no matter how
dubious a value it is.


I have seen the rinse and hold cycle recommended as a way to warm dishes.
Unfortunately, I never start a large meal with an empty dishwasher.


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 13-04-2004, 04:18 PM
DawnK
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
news

"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message
...


"mocha" wrote in message ...
I know the dishwasher has the rinse/hold cycle
that's supposed to do that for you, but it seems like an extra use of
electricity and water that would be a waste. Does anyone have

experience
actually using this cycle, and do you feel it's a more efficient use

of
resources versus doing it by hand? Thanks!

JP


Used the cycle once in about 30 years of DW ownership. It is supposed

to
rinse the dishes and keep them ready for the wash cycle when you finally
fill up the machine. To me, it is a waste of time.

FWIW, the machine uses less water than the typical hand wash and rinse.
Detergents today are better than they were when the R & H cycle was
invented. My guess is that the manufacturers are afraid to eliminate it
because no one want to be first to eliminate a "feature" no matter how
dubious a value it is.


I have seen the rinse and hold cycle recommended as a way to warm dishes.
Unfortunately, I never start a large meal with an empty dishwasher.



Neither do I! LOL! I don't like the rinse/hold cycle. If I run the rinse
and hold, then let the dishwasher sit, wet, overnight. When I open it the
next day, I'm knocked over by the smell of mustiness from all the wet dishes
sitting in a dark, warm dishwasher. Yuck!

Dawn


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2004, 05:20 AM
Cape Cod Bob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle

On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 11:25:56 -0400, "mocha" wrote:

I grew up in a dishwasherless house, and thus handwashed everything. Even
now with my own house, I've always been one to rinse off my plates/flatware
before putting them in the dishwasher for fear of food concretions requiring
a jack hammer to get off. I know the dishwasher has the rinse/hold cycle
that's supposed to do that for you, but it seems like an extra use of
electricity and water that would be a waste. Does anyone have experience
actually using this cycle, and do you feel it's a more efficient use of
resources versus doing it by hand? Thanks!


I just read a Consumer Reports 2003 report on dishwashers at the
doctor's office. CR recommends against Rinse and Hold and against
manually pre-rinsing dishes. Neither gets dishes cleaner and both
waste water.
Cape Cod Bob
Visit my web site at http://home.comcast.net/~bobmethelis
Delete the two "spam"s for email
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2004, 03:08 PM
Blanche Nonken
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle

Cape Cod Bob wrote:

I just read a Consumer Reports 2003 report on dishwashers at the
doctor's office.


Wow. My doctor's office doesn't have any dishwashers. :-)

  #9 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2004, 11:22 AM
sd
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle

In article ,
"mocha" wrote:

Does anyone have experience
actually using this cycle, and do you feel it's a more efficient use of
resources versus doing it by hand? Thanks!


No. My dishwasher (an Asko) uses far less water for a load of dishes
than I would washing by hand. In addition, I've seen several
admonitions against rinsing plates before dishwashing, especially with
enzymatic detergents, because if the detergent cannot work on food, it
works on the finish of your dishes and pots and pans. Don't bother
with rinse-and-hold.

sd
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 17-04-2004, 12:49 PM
Viviane
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle

The only times I use the rinse option is if we've had something smelly (like
fish) in summer and the dishwasher isn't full enough for a cycle. Or if
we're going away and I've got some dirty dishes in there I rinse them as I
don't like to leave it running when we're away for a few days. We also just
scrape and put the dishes in - the dishwasher does the rest - that's why we
have one.

Viviane

"mocha" wrote in message
...
I grew up in a dishwasherless house, and thus handwashed everything. Even
now with my own house, I've always been one to rinse off my

plates/flatware
before putting them in the dishwasher for fear of food concretions

requiring
a jack hammer to get off. I know the dishwasher has the rinse/hold cycle
that's supposed to do that for you, but it seems like an extra use of
electricity and water that would be a waste. Does anyone have experience
actually using this cycle, and do you feel it's a more efficient use of
resources versus doing it by hand? Thanks!

JP




  #11 (permalink)  
Old 25-04-2004, 04:11 PM
scorpiogirl
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle

"Viviane" wrote in message . au...
The only times I use the rinse option is if we've had something smelly (like
fish) in summer and the dishwasher isn't full enough for a cycle. Or if
we're going away and I've got some dirty dishes in there I rinse them as I
don't like to leave it running when we're away for a few days. We also just
scrape and put the dishes in - the dishwasher does the rest - that's why we
have one.

Viviane


I use the rinse & hold cycle occasionally to clean items that don't
contain food particles & don't need "scrubbing":
clean dusty special occasions items that haven't been used lately
clean vases, figurines & other similar items
clean new items of factory dust & germs
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 25-04-2004, 05:45 PM
Vox Humana
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle


"scorpiogirl" wrote in message
om...
"Viviane" wrote in message

. au...
The only times I use the rinse option is if we've had something smelly

(like
fish) in summer and the dishwasher isn't full enough for a cycle. Or if
we're going away and I've got some dirty dishes in there I rinse them as

I
don't like to leave it running when we're away for a few days. We also

just
scrape and put the dishes in - the dishwasher does the rest - that's why

we
have one.

Viviane


I use the rinse & hold cycle occasionally to clean items that don't
contain food particles & don't need "scrubbing":
clean dusty special occasions items that haven't been used lately
clean vases, figurines & other similar items
clean new items of factory dust & germs


I always wonder about how sanitary dishes are after the rinse and hold
cycle. I know that some people use this cycle to warm dishes. There is
water left in the dishwasher from the previous cycle that might contain food
particles. Recently I was using the seam cleaner on the dishwasher around
the gasket. I accidentally touched the bottom of the door that is normally
out of sight. A large chuck of gelatinous crap came off. Upon further
inspection, there the entire bottom of the door was coated with a disgusting
layer of black crud. I had to use a plastic putty knife to remove it. I
always us the sani-rinse cycle that heats the water to 160F and still what
looked like a thick biofilm developed on the door.


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 25-04-2004, 06:53 PM
Wayne Boatwright
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle

"Vox Humana" wrote in
:


"scorpiogirl" wrote in message
om...
"Viviane" wrote in message

. au...
The only times I use the rinse option is if we've had something
smelly

(like
fish) in summer and the dishwasher isn't full enough for a cycle.
Or if we're going away and I've got some dirty dishes in there I
rinse them as

I
don't like to leave it running when we're away for a few days. We
also

just
scrape and put the dishes in - the dishwasher does the rest -
that's why

we
have one.

Viviane


I use the rinse & hold cycle occasionally to clean items that don't
contain food particles & don't need "scrubbing":
clean dusty special occasions items that haven't been used lately
clean vases, figurines & other similar items
clean new items of factory dust & germs


I always wonder about how sanitary dishes are after the rinse and hold
cycle. I know that some people use this cycle to warm dishes. There
is water left in the dishwasher from the previous cycle that might
contain food particles. Recently I was using the seam cleaner on the
dishwasher around the gasket. I accidentally touched the bottom of
the door that is normally out of sight. A large chuck of gelatinous
crap came off. Upon further inspection, there the entire bottom of
the door was coated with a disgusting layer of black crud. I had to
use a plastic putty knife to remove it. I always us the sani-rinse
cycle that heats the water to 160F and still what looked like a thick
biofilm developed on the door.


I've battled this stuff for years after I discovered it the first time.
It seems to happen on almost all dishwashers regardless of the cycles
used, and as best as I can tell, the sludge seems to be a combination of
dishwasher detergent and grease. Once I discovered this I began a
monthly regimen of monthly scrubbing with a light grade scrubby sponge
which doesn't scratch but does break up the crud. Oddly enough, my
current dishwasher (a very inexpensive Whirlpool) does not develop this
problem at all. Having said all that, I'm not sure that this stuff is
all that dangerous givent that a large component of it is detergent and
that very hot water is always being jetted throughout the machine. I've
never seen any of this redeposit on any items being washed or in other
areas of the dishwasher.

Wayne
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2004, 02:35 AM
Vox Humana
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dishwasher rinse & hold cycle


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
. ..
"Vox Humana" wrote in
:


"scorpiogirl" wrote in message
om...
"Viviane" wrote in message

. au...
The only times I use the rinse option is if we've had something
smelly

(like
fish) in summer and the dishwasher isn't full enough for a cycle.
Or if we're going away and I've got some dirty dishes in there I
rinse them as

I
don't like to leave it running when we're away for a few days. We
also

just
scrape and put the dishes in - the dishwasher does the rest -
that's why

we
have one.

Viviane


I use the rinse & hold cycle occasionally to clean items that don't
contain food particles & don't need "scrubbing":
clean dusty special occasions items that haven't been used lately
clean vases, figurines & other similar items
clean new items of factory dust & germs


I always wonder about how sanitary dishes are after the rinse and hold
cycle. I know that some people use this cycle to warm dishes. There
is water left in the dishwasher from the previous cycle that might
contain food particles. Recently I was using the seam cleaner on the
dishwasher around the gasket. I accidentally touched the bottom of
the door that is normally out of sight. A large chuck of gelatinous
crap came off. Upon further inspection, there the entire bottom of
the door was coated with a disgusting layer of black crud. I had to
use a plastic putty knife to remove it. I always us the sani-rinse
cycle that heats the water to 160F and still what looked like a thick
biofilm developed on the door.


I've battled this stuff for years after I discovered it the first time.
It seems to happen on almost all dishwashers regardless of the cycles
used, and as best as I can tell, the sludge seems to be a combination of
dishwasher detergent and grease. Once I discovered this I began a
monthly regimen of monthly scrubbing with a light grade scrubby sponge
which doesn't scratch but does break up the crud. Oddly enough, my
current dishwasher (a very inexpensive Whirlpool) does not develop this
problem at all. Having said all that, I'm not sure that this stuff is
all that dangerous givent that a large component of it is detergent and
that very hot water is always being jetted throughout the machine. I've
never seen any of this redeposit on any items being washed or in other
areas of the dishwasher.



It PROBABLY isn't anything to worry however it was very shocking to see the
amount of crap growing inside my dishwasher. I assume that it escapes the
jets of water due to its location. There might be a niche were the
temperatures don't reach as high as the rest of the dishwasher. I suppose
there are people who work for companies like Kitchenaid who know exactly
what this stuff is.


 




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