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Cooking Equipment (rec.food.equipment) Discussion of food-related equipment. Includes items used in food preparation and storage, including major and minor appliances, gadgets and utensils, infrastructure, and food- and recipe-related software.

Electric Stove Not Hot Enough



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 22-11-2004, 11:27 PM
Niel
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Default Electric Stove Not Hot Enough

New house (to us) with 18-year-old Jenn-Air coil surface elements that
just don't get hot enough. Contacts seem good. Could it just need
new coil surface elements or sockets or both? I'd rather not buy a
whole new stove.
Also, 18-year-old GE oven doesn't seem to heat up to the set
temperature. Could it just need new heating elements or sockets or
both, too?
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 22-11-2004, 11:44 PM
John R Weiss
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Default

"Niel" wrote...
New house (to us) with 18-year-old Jenn-Air coil surface elements that
just don't get hot enough. Contacts seem good. Could it just need
new coil surface elements or sockets or both? I'd rather not buy a
whole new stove.
Also, 18-year-old GE oven doesn't seem to heat up to the set
temperature. Could it just need new heating elements or sockets or
both, too?


Check the electric supply. Is the voltage at the stove correct? if not, you
may need to check into the house wiring.

Check the sockets. Is there any dirt, grease, or corrosion built up? Remove
each element and check.

Check the oven temp. Get an oven thermometer and check the accuracy of the
thermostat.


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 22-11-2004, 11:44 PM
John R Weiss
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Default

"Niel" wrote...
New house (to us) with 18-year-old Jenn-Air coil surface elements that
just don't get hot enough. Contacts seem good. Could it just need
new coil surface elements or sockets or both? I'd rather not buy a
whole new stove.
Also, 18-year-old GE oven doesn't seem to heat up to the set
temperature. Could it just need new heating elements or sockets or
both, too?


Check the electric supply. Is the voltage at the stove correct? if not, you
may need to check into the house wiring.

Check the sockets. Is there any dirt, grease, or corrosion built up? Remove
each element and check.

Check the oven temp. Get an oven thermometer and check the accuracy of the
thermostat.


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 12:50 AM
Donald Tsang
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Default

In article ,
Niel wrote:
New house (to us) with 18-year-old Jenn-Air coil surface elements that
just don't get hot enough. Contacts seem good. Could it just need
new coil surface elements or sockets or both? I'd rather not buy a
whole new stove.


Is it possible that you have a 220v stove being powered by a 110v line?

(on a more serious note, are you used to cooking on electric? Electric
stoves certainly doesn't get as hot as gas stoves...)

Donald
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 01:27 AM
John R Weiss
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Default

"Donald Tsang" wrote...

(on a more serious note, are you used to cooking on electric? Electric
stoves certainly doesn't get as hot as gas stoves...)


I think you'll find that among regular-grade (not "commercial") stoves, electric
stoves are rated at a higher BTU output than gas stoves on the burners. They
take longer to heat up, but put out more heat once they get there.

Some of the newer glass-top and "InfraRed" electric burners may be lower, and
there may be a few "high-output" gas burners, but on average the electric stove
will boil a pot of water faster.


 




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