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Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 04:21 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
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Posts: 26
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 04:29 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
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Posts: 5,103
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Doc" wrote in message
...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks



Drill drainage holes in the bottom and make it into a planter for small
cactus. Buy a new one. Seriously. Make sure the next wok is plain metal.
Non-stick pans shouldn't be used at the high heat levels typical of wok
cooking. I don't care what the manufacturers say.


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 04:36 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,830
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 15:29:00 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

"Doc" wrote in message
...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks



Drill drainage holes in the bottom and make it into a planter for small
cactus.


Or wear it as a dunce cap for shopping at walmart.

Buy a new one. Seriously. Make sure the next wok is plain metal.
Non-stick pans shouldn't be used at the high heat levels typical of wok
cooking. I don't care what the manufacturers say.


Yep.

Lou
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 04:38 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Doc wrote:

I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks


It wasn't from walmart, but I did exactly this to a large wok
that I just didn't want to throw away. I used a wire wheel on a
side grinder to remove the teflon, then sanded it lightly with
emory cloth to remove the rest and smooth everything out. I have
been using it for about 5 years like that.

The problem is that the metal is very prone to rusting, so I have
to oil it after every cleaning, and temper it like a cast iron
pan. Since I mostly use it on a fish fryer grill (although I
will use it on the stove), it has held up pretty well. It ain't
pretty by any means, but useful.

--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
Georgetown, TX
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 04:39 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,457
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?


"Doc" wrote in message
...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking?


It's going to be aluminum.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 04:44 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,244
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Doc wrote:
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks


Give the toy big box version to your kids to play with and pick up a
real wok. They aren't expensive and you don't have to wonder if it is
safe to use.
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 04:47 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 26
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mar 4, 10:39*am, "cybercat" wrote:

but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking?


It's going to be aluminum.



It's steel. Magnet test. This thing is fairly hefty, which is why I
hate just tossing it.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 05:03 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
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Posts: 3
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

cybercat wrote:
"Doc" wrote in message
...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking?


It's going to be aluminum.


Maybe, maybe not.

I'm not really sure what substrate they use for Xylan. But whatever
it is it won't make a good Wok.

Wikipedia has a nice article on Woks:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wok

The downside is to get a good quality Wok or you'll wind up wasting time
seasoning it or just not getting the results you want. I've had a lot of
cheap woks, I think it makes a lot more sense to get a decent quality
wok and take care of it. It should last a very long time.

Jeff



  #9 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 05:07 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Robert Allison wrote:

The problem is that the metal is very prone to rusting, so I have
to oil it after every cleaning, and temper it like a cast iron
pan. Since I mostly use it on a fish fryer grill (although I
will use it on the stove), it has held up pretty well. It ain't
pretty by any means, but useful.


How are you "cleaning" it? Wiping it out with a paper towel should be
sufficient. Do not ever subject an iron utensil (or maybe your skillet) to
water.

Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 05:40 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Find your local body shop that does soft media blasting. Have it blasted
off there.

s

"Doc" wrote in message
...
On Mar 4, 10:39 am, "cybercat" wrote:

It's steel. Magnet test. This thing is fairly hefty, which is why I
hate just tossing it.


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 05:43 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,507
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?


"Doc" wrote in message
...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks




Sand blasting would remove the coating pretty easily, and the rough
surface should smooth out and "season" fairly quickly with use;
especially if you use steel utensils.

Bob
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 06:37 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 07:21:52 -0800 (PST), Doc
wrote:

I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks


I found out how to remove "Teflon". Simmer tomato sauce for a couple
of days. When you toss the sauce out the Teflon goes with it :-))

The acid destroyed the Teflon.

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 08:28 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mar 4, 9:21*am, Doc wrote:
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. *Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.

Thanks


I have a few similarly well worn pans in my kichen cubbard.
With the "more recent" (w.i. the past 20-30 years) years of cookware,
the metal base is very likely ALUMINUM, which when heated is very
toxic.
What I did and recommend is to simply continue cooking with the Xylan
surface by using THICK COATS of the non-stick spray-on cooking oils or
simply let the 4-leg use this worn pan as a drinking bowl.
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 08:37 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mar 4, 2:28*pm, Charles van Blommestein wrote:
On Mar 4, 9:21*am, Doc wrote:





I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. *Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.


I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.


Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks


I have a few similarly well worn pans in my kichen cubbard.
With the "more recent" (w.i. the past 20-30 years) years of cookware,
the metal base is very likely ALUMINUM, which when heated is very
toxic.
What I did and recommend is to simply continue cooking with the Xylan
surface by using THICK COATS of the non-stick spray-on cooking oils or
simply let the 4-leg use this worn pan as a drinking bowl.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


let the 4-leg use this worn pan as a drinking bowl

SWMBO would kill me - not because I let the dog drink out of a pan,
but because I tried to give her dog cancer.

She's convinced that any and all non-stick surface coatings are toxic.
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 04-03-2008, 08:39 PM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,sci.chem,misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Doc" wrote...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok.


Why bother removing it? Just use it with a little oil!


 




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