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Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

Helpful hints for bbq



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-05-2006, 03:33 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 2
Default Helpful hints for bbq

1. Cooking Brisket: I usually cook a brisket at 200 degrees for
approximately one half hour per pound of meat. Since a brisket is such
a large chunk of meat and a little on the stringy side, it will often
absorb too much smoke; therefore, I won't usually cook a brisket
entirely in a smoker. I cook a brisket in the oven (in a roasting pan)
at 200 degrees until it has about an hour left to cook. Then I transfer
it to a smoker to finish cooking.
2. Cooking Chicken: To cook chicken on a grill, I always put down a
layer of foil and I'm no closer than the middle or top rack. Chicken
skin burns easy and it's hard to get done to the bone, especially
white meat. So, cook it slow, turning frequently. You'll know it's
done when the chicken is firm and it doesn't't bleed when you squeeze
it. Chicken is one of the hardest meats to get just right. Practice
times three.
3. Smoking on a gas grill: Don't try to smoke large cuts of meat like
this, but this method will help you get a nice smoky flavor to smaller
cuts like a small rack of pork ribs, chicken, fish, etc. Take several
small pieces of the wood of your choice, i.e. hickory, mesquite, oak,
etc. and soak them in water for at least a couple of hours. (Be certain
the wood is totally immersed in water.) Place the pieces of wood in a
shallow (throwaway) tin pan, or something similar. Line the meat rack
(at least the second or top rack) with heavy duty or two layers of
foil. Preheat the grill to usually around 300 degrees. Place the meat
on the foil (wipe the foil lightly with oil to keep the meat from
sticking) and place the tin with wood chips on the lower rack. Close
the grill and let the wood chips do their job. Be careful, because
occasionally the wood chips will catch on fire. When that happens I use
a spray bottle of water and put the fire out and close the grill lid.
4. To use barbecue sauce as a marinade: Dilute sauce by mixing two
beers to each cup of barbecue sauce. Mix well.
5. Never marinade meat with full strength sauce.
6. Only when the meat has finished cooking can you baste with full
strength sauce.
7. Cooked meat that has been coated with full strength sauce can only
be can be left on the grill for a few minutes, turning the meat
frequently to prevent scorching.
8. Keep in mind that you can use this sauce on oven-cooked foods as
well. The smoky flavor in the sauce will convince your guest(s) that
you spent all day over a smoker or grill!
http://barbecueyfps.blogspot.com/

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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-05-2006, 04:28 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 2
Default Helpful hints for bbq

Boy. This cat's axing for trouble.

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-05-2006, 05:10 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 229
Default Helpful hints for bbq

In alt.food.barbecue, wrote:
1. Cooking Brisket: I usually cook a brisket at 200 degrees for
approximately one half hour per pound of meat. Since a brisket is such
a large chunk of meat and a little on the stringy side, it will often
absorb too much smoke; therefore, I won't usually cook a brisket
entirely in a smoker. I cook a brisket in the oven (in a roasting pan)
at 200 degrees until it has about an hour left to cook. Then I transfer
it to a smoker to finish cooking.


Try using a cleaner burn instead. Hot meat absorbs little smoke. I
suspect that you are just putting a thinner layer of creosote on your
brisket using the method you describe. Your smoke should be nearly
colorless before you put the meat in your smoker.



2. Cooking Chicken: To cook chicken on a grill, I always put down a
layer of foil and I'm no closer than the middle or top rack.


You may as well just cook it on the stovetop if you do that.


Chicken
skin burns easy and it's hard to get done to the bone, especially
white meat. So, cook it slow, turning frequently. You'll know it's
done when the chicken is firm and it doesn't't bleed when you squeeze
it. Chicken is one of the hardest meats to get just right. Practice
times three.


You ae using too high a heat. And you should cook it skin-side up at
first, so the coals can get a bit cooler before you put it skin side down.



3. Smoking on a gas grill: Don't try to smoke large cuts of meat like
this, but this method will help you get a nice smoky flavor to smaller
cuts like a small rack of pork ribs, chicken, fish, etc. Take several
small pieces of the wood of your choice, i.e. hickory, mesquite, oak,
etc. and soak them in water for at least a couple of hours. (Be certain
the wood is totally immersed in water.) Place the pieces of wood in a
shallow (throwaway) tin pan, or something similar. Line the meat rack
(at least the second or top rack) with heavy duty or two layers of
foil. Preheat the grill to usually around 300 degrees. Place the meat
on the foil (wipe the foil lightly with oil to keep the meat from
sticking) and place the tin with wood chips on the lower rack. Close
the grill and let the wood chips do their job.


"Their Job" is not to steam and smolder, but rather, to burn cleanly.
This method imparts a bitter taste to the meat.



Be careful, because
occasionally the wood chips will catch on fire. When that happens I use
a spray bottle of water and put the fire out and close the grill lid.


This will fill the inside of the grill with particulate matter from the
smoldering, steaming wood.



4. To use barbecue sauce as a marinade: Dilute sauce by mixing two
beers to each cup of barbecue sauce. Mix well.


No wonder you burn your chicken. Sugary marinades BURN.


5. Never marinade meat with full strength sauce.
6. Only when the meat has finished cooking can you baste with full
strength sauce.
7. Cooked meat that has been coated with full strength sauce can only
be can be left on the grill for a few minutes, turning the meat
frequently to prevent scorching.
8. Keep in mind that you can use this sauce on oven-cooked foods as
well. The smoky flavor in the sauce will convince your guest(s) that
you spent all day over a smoker or grill!


Only if your guests know nothing about what properly grilled and barbecued
meats taste like.


http://xxxxxxxxfps.blogspot.com/

This is spam from someone who knows little about the subject at hand.


--
A nation of sheep will beget a government of wolves.
--Edward R. Murrow
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-05-2006, 06:29 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 143
Default Helpful hints for bbq

In article .com, wrote:
1. Cooking Brisket: I usually cook a brisket at 200 degrees for
approximately one half hour per pound of meat. Since a brisket is such
a large chunk of meat and a little on the stringy side, it will often
absorb too much smoke; therefore, I won't usually cook a brisket
entirely in a smoker. I cook a brisket in the oven (in a roasting pan)
at 200 degrees until it has about an hour left to cook. Then I transfer
it to a smoker to finish cooking.
2. Cooking Chicken: To cook chicken on a grill, I always put down a
layer of foil and I'm no closer than the middle or top rack. Chicken
skin burns easy and it's hard to get done to the bone, especially
white meat. So, cook it slow, turning frequently. You'll know it's
done when the chicken is firm and it doesn't't bleed when you squeeze
it. Chicken is one of the hardest meats to get just right. Practice
times three.


Hmm.. This sounds like a bunch of crud to me.. You can cook either one
of these very easily and turn out great results assuming you've got a
decent BBQ of some sort or another.. I cooked a brisket a while back
for my neighbor and I and he loved it -- it was done 100% in the
smoker.. If you follow #1 directions above, you might as well not even
bother firing up the grill and just do the hole enchilada in the oven
and call it "oven roasted" instead.

For #2 above, I just did smoked chicken the other day (about a week
ago) on my smoker and only turned it 3 times during the entire cook
and it came out great -- the skin is there for a reason -- to protect
the meat that is to be eaten -- sure you can eat the skin, but think
of it as an insurance policy of sorts.. YMMV..

Just my $0.02 worth..

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 05-05-2006, 01:53 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 23
Default Helpful hints for bbq

Rick F. wrote:
I cook a brisket in the oven (in a roasting pan)
at 200 degrees until it has about an hour left to cook. Then I transfer
it to a smoker to finish cooking.


I usually boil mine for 30 minutes, cook in the microwave for another 15
min, then slather it with the super secret BBQ sauce. It tastes just
like you cooked it for 20 hours. However, the sauce is SO good, I've
found that really there is no need to cook anything. I just rummage
through the closet, find an old shoe or shirt, and cover with sauce.
The results are impressive!






--
Greetings from the Hog and Hominy State!
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 05-05-2006, 05:57 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 143
Default Helpful hints for bbq

In article , MonopTN wrote:
I usually boil mine for 30 minutes, cook in the microwave for another 15
min, then slather it with the super secret BBQ sauce. It tastes just
like you cooked it for 20 hours. However, the sauce is SO good, I've
found that really there is no need to cook anything. I just rummage
through the closet, find an old shoe or shirt, and cover with sauce.
The results are impressive!


Damn.. Sounds too good to be true.. Let me know when you're going to do
this next time so I can come over and take a chomp or two.. (8-


 




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