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Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

Smoked ring bologna & pork sausage



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 08:46 PM
Pete Romfh
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Smoked ring bologna & pork sausage

My wife's family is from Central Wisconsin (Bloomer). Her dad had a
smokehouse on the farm and made rings of a pork sausage that were some of
the best I've ever eaten. He also made (and smoked) rings of a dark red
bologna. I've been trying to capture the recipe and have gotten his
description of the process and a hand written recipe that describes the
process and basic ingredients. But it mentions adding "spices" without
describing type or quantity. At 90 Grandpa's memory is just a bit vague so
I'm looking for extra help.

I know there's Mace, salt, and cure in the bologna but it's talking 1oz of
mace in a 100 lb batch of meat. That didn't seem proportional.
The directions for "Smoked sausage" are even more vague, calling for pork,
cold water, cure, and spices. He preferred things simple so the spices might
just be salt & pepper but I'd sure like some clearer ideas.

I'm planning on making a few small batches of each type to clarify and take
pictures. The "smokehouse" will have to be our WSM so I'll be scaling the
recipes down by a factor of 20.

I'd love to hear your ideas and guidance on this.

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at hal dash pc dot org


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 09:57 PM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Pete Romfh" wrote:
My wife's family is from Central Wisconsin (Bloomer). Her dad had a
smokehouse on the farm and made rings of a pork sausage that were some of
the best I've ever eaten. He also made (and smoked) rings of a dark red
bologna. I've been trying to capture the recipe and have gotten his
description of the process and a hand written recipe that describes the
process and basic ingredients. But it mentions adding "spices" without
describing type or quantity. At 90 Grandpa's memory is just a bit vague
so I'm looking for extra help.


Hi Pete,

I haven't made these myself, but in 'Great Sausage Recipes and Meat
Curing', Rytek Kutas describes Smoked Pork Breakfast Sausage (p. 210) and
Smoked Ring Bologna (p. 205), among many others.

For 10 lbs of Sausage, his spices a 2 level tsp. Prague Powder # 1, 6
Tbs. salt, 1 Tbs. ground white pepper, 2 Tbs. rubbed sage, 1 tsp. ground
ginger, 1 Tbs. ground nutmeg [note: mace], 1 Tbs. thyme, 1 cup soy protein
concentrate.

For 10 lbs. of Ring Bologna, his spices a 2 level tsp. Prague Powder #
1, 1 Tbs. ground white pepper, 2 Tbs. paprika, 1 Tbs. ground nutmeg [note:
mace], 1 tsp. allspice, 1 tsp. onion powder, 8 Tbs. salt, 2 cups non-fat
dry milk or soy protein concentrate.

Hope this helps.

--
Nick. Christmas Day, the twenty-fifth Day of December, being established a
Federal holiday by an Act of Congress on June 28, 1870: Merry Christmas!

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops! You are not forgotten. Thanks.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 09:57 PM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Pete Romfh" wrote:
My wife's family is from Central Wisconsin (Bloomer). Her dad had a
smokehouse on the farm and made rings of a pork sausage that were some of
the best I've ever eaten. He also made (and smoked) rings of a dark red
bologna. I've been trying to capture the recipe and have gotten his
description of the process and a hand written recipe that describes the
process and basic ingredients. But it mentions adding "spices" without
describing type or quantity. At 90 Grandpa's memory is just a bit vague
so I'm looking for extra help.


Hi Pete,

I haven't made these myself, but in 'Great Sausage Recipes and Meat
Curing', Rytek Kutas describes Smoked Pork Breakfast Sausage (p. 210) and
Smoked Ring Bologna (p. 205), among many others.

For 10 lbs of Sausage, his spices a 2 level tsp. Prague Powder # 1, 6
Tbs. salt, 1 Tbs. ground white pepper, 2 Tbs. rubbed sage, 1 tsp. ground
ginger, 1 Tbs. ground nutmeg [note: mace], 1 Tbs. thyme, 1 cup soy protein
concentrate.

For 10 lbs. of Ring Bologna, his spices a 2 level tsp. Prague Powder #
1, 1 Tbs. ground white pepper, 2 Tbs. paprika, 1 Tbs. ground nutmeg [note:
mace], 1 tsp. allspice, 1 tsp. onion powder, 8 Tbs. salt, 2 cups non-fat
dry milk or soy protein concentrate.

Hope this helps.

--
Nick. Christmas Day, the twenty-fifth Day of December, being established a
Federal holiday by an Act of Congress on June 28, 1870: Merry Christmas!

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops! You are not forgotten. Thanks.
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2004, 12:21 AM
Harry Demidavicius
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 10 Dec 2004 21:57:06 GMT, wrote:

"Pete Romfh" wrote:
My wife's family is from Central Wisconsin (Bloomer). Her dad had a
smokehouse on the farm and made rings of a pork sausage that were some of
the best I've ever eaten. He also made (and smoked) rings of a dark red
bologna. I've been trying to capture the recipe and have gotten his
description of the process and a hand written recipe that describes the
process and basic ingredients. But it mentions adding "spices" without
describing type or quantity. At 90 Grandpa's memory is just a bit vague
so I'm looking for extra help.


Hi Pete,

I haven't made these myself, but in 'Great Sausage Recipes and Meat
Curing', Rytek Kutas describes Smoked Pork Breakfast Sausage (p. 210) and
Smoked Ring Bologna (p. 205), among many others.

For 10 lbs of Sausage, his spices a 2 level tsp. Prague Powder # 1, 6
Tbs. salt, 1 Tbs. ground white pepper, 2 Tbs. rubbed sage, 1 tsp. ground
ginger, 1 Tbs. ground nutmeg [note: mace], 1 Tbs. thyme, 1 cup soy protein
concentrate.

For 10 lbs. of Ring Bologna, his spices a 2 level tsp. Prague Powder #
1, 1 Tbs. ground white pepper, 2 Tbs. paprika, 1 Tbs. ground nutmeg [note:
mace], 1 tsp. allspice, 1 tsp. onion powder, 8 Tbs. salt, 2 cups non-fat
dry milk or soy protein concentrate.

Hope this helps.


The only thing that has been recommended to me by my butcher
especially when making a smoked sausage is to cut the salt in half.

Harry
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2004, 02:42 AM
Pete Romfh
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote:
"Pete Romfh" wrote:
My wife's family is from Central Wisconsin (Bloomer).
Her dad had a smokehouse on the farm and made rings of a
pork sausage that were some of the best I've ever eaten.
He also made (and smoked) rings of a dark red bologna.
I've been trying to capture the recipe and have gotten
his description of the process and a hand written recipe
that describes the process and basic ingredients. But it
mentions adding "spices" without describing type or
quantity. At 90 Grandpa's memory is just a bit vague so
I'm looking for extra help.


Hi Pete,

I haven't made these myself, but in 'Great Sausage
Recipes and Meat Curing', Rytek Kutas describes Smoked
Pork Breakfast Sausage (p. 210) and Smoked Ring Bologna
(p. 205), among many others.

For 10 lbs of Sausage, his spices a 2 level tsp.
Prague Powder # 1, 6 Tbs. salt, 1 Tbs. ground white
pepper, 2 Tbs. rubbed sage, 1 tsp. ground ginger, 1 Tbs.
ground nutmeg [note: mace], 1 Tbs. thyme, 1 cup soy
protein concentrate.

For 10 lbs. of Ring Bologna, his spices a 2 level tsp.
Prague Powder # 1, 1 Tbs. ground white pepper, 2 Tbs.
paprika, 1 Tbs. ground nutmeg [note: mace], 1 tsp.
allspice, 1 tsp. onion powder, 8 Tbs. salt, 2 cups non-
fat dry milk or soy protein concentrate.

Hope this helps.

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops! You are not
forgotten. Thanks.


This is a good start. I'll post results when I try them.

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at hal dash pc dot org


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2004, 02:43 AM
Pete Romfh
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Harry Demidavicius wrote:
On 10 Dec 2004 21:57:06 GMT,
wrote:

"Pete Romfh" wrote:
My wife's family is from Central Wisconsin (Bloomer).
Her dad had a smokehouse on the farm and made rings of
a pork sausage that were some of the best I've ever
eaten. He also made (and smoked) rings of a dark red
bologna. I've been trying to capture the recipe and
have gotten his description of the process and a hand
written recipe that describes the process and basic
ingredients. But it mentions adding "spices" without
describing type or quantity. At 90 Grandpa's memory is
just a bit vague so I'm looking for extra help.


Hi Pete,

I haven't made these myself, but in 'Great Sausage
Recipes and Meat Curing', Rytek Kutas describes Smoked
Pork Breakfast Sausage (p. 210) and Smoked Ring Bologna
(p. 205), among many others.

For 10 lbs of Sausage, his spices a 2 level tsp.
Prague Powder # 1, 6 Tbs. salt, 1 Tbs. ground white
pepper, 2 Tbs. rubbed sage, 1 tsp. ground ginger, 1 Tbs.
ground nutmeg [note: mace], 1 Tbs. thyme, 1 cup soy
protein concentrate.

For 10 lbs. of Ring Bologna, his spices a 2 level
tsp. Prague Powder # 1, 1 Tbs. ground white pepper, 2
Tbs. paprika, 1 Tbs. ground nutmeg [note: mace], 1 tsp.
allspice, 1 tsp. onion powder, 8 Tbs. salt, 2 cups non-
fat dry milk or soy protein concentrate.

Hope this helps.


The only thing that has been recommended to me by my
butcher especially when making a smoked sausage is to cut
the salt in half.

Harry


I'll give it a shot.

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at hal dash pc dot org


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2004, 04:16 AM
Louis Cohen
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Those are cold-smoked, aren't they? Will you use a hotplate for heat?

--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Louis Cohen
Living la vida loca at N37 43' 7.9" W122 8' 42.8"


"Pete Romfh" wrote in message
...
My wife's family is from Central Wisconsin (Bloomer). Her dad had a
smokehouse on the farm and made rings of a pork sausage that were some of
the best I've ever eaten. He also made (and smoked) rings of a dark red
bologna. I've been trying to capture the recipe and have gotten his
description of the process and a hand written recipe that describes the
process and basic ingredients. But it mentions adding "spices" without
describing type or quantity. At 90 Grandpa's memory is just a bit vague so
I'm looking for extra help.

I know there's Mace, salt, and cure in the bologna but it's talking 1oz of
mace in a 100 lb batch of meat. That didn't seem proportional.
The directions for "Smoked sausage" are even more vague, calling for pork,
cold water, cure, and spices. He preferred things simple so the spices
might
just be salt & pepper but I'd sure like some clearer ideas.

I'm planning on making a few small batches of each type to clarify and
take
pictures. The "smokehouse" will have to be our WSM so I'll be scaling the
recipes down by a factor of 20.

I'd love to hear your ideas and guidance on this.

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at hal dash pc dot org




  #8 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2004, 04:49 AM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Pete Romfh" wrote:
wrote:
[]
I haven't made these myself, but in 'Great Sausage
Recipes and Meat Curing', Rytek Kutas describes Smoked
Pork Breakfast Sausage (p. 210) and Smoked Ring Bologna
(p. 205), among many others.[]


This is a good start. I'll post results when I try them.


You might want to see if your local public library has the book, too.

--
Nick. Christmas Day, the twenty-fifth Day of December, being established a
Federal holiday by an Act of Congress on June 28, 1870: Merry Christmas!

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops! You are not forgotten. Thanks.
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2004, 12:43 PM
Pete Romfh
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Louis Cohen wrote:
Those are cold-smoked, aren't they? Will you use a
hotplate for heat?


I'm thinking to use a small fire i.e. 1/2 a chimney. It may take careful
monitoring in the "micro" environment of the WSM. Shooting for a smoke temp
of 170 - 180 initially with a rise to 250 at the end to get the internal
meat temp up to 155. I read that method in some of my reasearch.

I used a hotplate with a cast iron pan and wood chips to make jerky quite a
few years ago. Converted an old refrigerator into a smokehouse. It worked
pretty well except for the call to the fire department by a neighbor about
"a refrigerator on fire next door". Had to give the guy a pound of jerky to
"thank him for watching out for me". =


--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at hal dash pc dot org


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2004, 12:43 PM
Pete Romfh
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Louis Cohen wrote:
Those are cold-smoked, aren't they? Will you use a
hotplate for heat?


I'm thinking to use a small fire i.e. 1/2 a chimney. It may take careful
monitoring in the "micro" environment of the WSM. Shooting for a smoke temp
of 170 - 180 initially with a rise to 250 at the end to get the internal
meat temp up to 155. I read that method in some of my reasearch.

I used a hotplate with a cast iron pan and wood chips to make jerky quite a
few years ago. Converted an old refrigerator into a smokehouse. It worked
pretty well except for the call to the fire department by a neighbor about
"a refrigerator on fire next door". Had to give the guy a pound of jerky to
"thank him for watching out for me". =


--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at hal dash pc dot org


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2004, 01:35 PM
Kevin S. Wilson
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 20:43:39 -0600, "Pete Romfh"
wrote:

Harry Demidavicius wrote:


snip 48 lines of quoted text

I'll give it a shot.


You know, Pete, it really isn't necessary to quote 48 lines of text in
a 1-line followup.
--
Kevin S. Wilson
Tech Writer at a university somewhere in Idaho
"When you can't do something completely impractical and intrinsically
useless *yourself*, you go get the Kibologists to do it for you." --J. Furr
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2004, 01:35 PM
Kevin S. Wilson
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 20:43:39 -0600, "Pete Romfh"
wrote:

Harry Demidavicius wrote:


snip 48 lines of quoted text

I'll give it a shot.


You know, Pete, it really isn't necessary to quote 48 lines of text in
a 1-line followup.
--
Kevin S. Wilson
Tech Writer at a university somewhere in Idaho
"When you can't do something completely impractical and intrinsically
useless *yourself*, you go get the Kibologists to do it for you." --J. Furr
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 12-12-2004, 12:16 PM
BOB
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Kevin S. Wilson wrote:
On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 20:43:39 -0600, "Pete Romfh"
wrote:

Harry Demidavicius wrote:


snip 48 lines of quoted text

I'll give it a shot.


You know, Pete, it really isn't necessary to quote 48 lines of text in
a 1-line followup.

Kevin S. Wilson



But Kevvie,
Please explain why this is more of a problem than all of your posts that
are posted in AFB *AND* in your favorite group (that has nothing to do
with BARBECUE).
Oh, it's only important to *YOU*? That's the difference?

Thanks for playing, BOB


 




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