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Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

Prime Rib



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 19-12-2011, 11:59 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 139
Default Prime Rib

Got this from America's Test Kitchen, have used it, and find that it
makes the best prime rib I have ever had.

I age it for 7 days. Also, I cut the meat off the rib and THEN TIE IT
BACK ONTO THE BONES before I roast it. This way it holds up well and
is easier to slice before serving.

Buy the ribs that are the 10,11, and 12th ribs as they are not a fatty
but still fatty enough.

Why this recipe works:

Most of us cook prime rib only once a year, if that, and don’t want to
risk experimenting with the cooking method—especially when the results
are no better than mediocre. We thought that a special-occasion roast
deserved better and wanted to find the best way to get the juicy,
tender, rosy meat that prime rib should have. The principal question
for roasting prime rib was oven temperature, and our research turned
up a wide range of recommendations. Most delivered meat that was
well-done on the outside but increasingly rare toward the center—not
too bad, but not exactly great. Surprisingly, the roast we cooked at a
temperature of only 250 degrees was rosy from the center all the way
out. Additionally, it retained more juice than a roast cooked at a
higher temperature, and the internal temperature rose less during
resting, so we had more control over the final degree of doneness.
Searing before roasting gave us a crusty brown exterior. For
seasoning, prime rib needs nothing more than salt and pepper. Now that
we’d found a dependable cooking method, we could serve this
once-a-year roast with confidence. (less)


For a roast that's as pink, juicy, and tender at the surface as it is
in the center, sear it first, then roast it long and low.


Serves 6 to 8


Remember, even a day or two of aging in the refrigerator will help.

Ingredients

1 first-cut beef rib roast , 3 ribs (about 7 pounds), set at room
temperature for 3 hours, tied twice between the rib bones (see
illustration below)
Salt and ground black pepper

Instructions

1. Adjust oven rack to low position and heat oven to 200 degrees. Heat
large roasting pan over two burners set at medium-high heat. Place
roast in hot pan and cook on all sides until nicely browned and about
1/2 cup fat has rendered, 6 to 8 minutes.


2. Remove roast from pan. Set wire rack in pan, then set roast on
rack. Generously season with salt and pepper.


3. Place roast in oven and roast until meat registers 130 degrees (for
medium-rare), about 3 1/2 hours (or about 30 minutes per pound). Let
stand 20 minutes (a bit longer is fine) before serving.


4. Transfer to cutting board and carve in accordance with the
instructions below.


Technique
Tying and Carving the Prime Rib

1. To carve, remove the twine and set the roast on a cutting board,
rib bones perpendicular to the board. Using a carving fork to hold the
roast in place, cut along the rib bones to sever the meat from the
bones.


2. Set the roast cut side down; carve the meat across the grain into
thick slices.


We didn't tie the first few prime ribs that we roasted. We found out
pretty quickly, though, that unless the roast was tied, the outer
layer of meat pulled away from the rib-eye muscle, causing the roast
to look a little unattractive. Separated from the main roast, this
outer flap of meat also tended to overcook. To solve this problem
easily, tie the roast at both ends running parallel to the bone.

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meat is inferior to pork.
- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927
Mark Twain

Gene
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 12:53 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 954
Default Prime Rib


"Gene" wrote in message
...
Got this from America's Test Kitchen, have used it, and find that it
makes the best prime rib I have ever had.

I age it for 7 days. Also, I cut the meat off the rib and THEN TIE IT
BACK ONTO THE BONES before I roast it. This way it holds up well and
is easier to slice before serving.

Buy the ribs that are the 10,11, and 12th ribs as they are not a fatty
but still fatty enough.

Why this recipe works:

Most of us cook prime rib only once a year, if that, and don't want to
risk experimenting with the cooking method-especially when the results
are no better than mediocre. We thought that a special-occasion roast
deserved better and wanted to find the best way to get the juicy,
tender, rosy meat that prime rib should have. The principal question
for roasting prime rib was oven temperature, and our research turned
up a wide range of recommendations. Most delivered meat that was
well-done on the outside but increasingly rare toward the center-not
too bad, but not exactly great. Surprisingly, the roast we cooked at a
temperature of only 250 degrees was rosy from the center all the way
out. Additionally, it retained more juice than a roast cooked at a
higher temperature, and the internal temperature rose less during
resting, so we had more control over the final degree of doneness.
Searing before roasting gave us a crusty brown exterior. For
seasoning, prime rib needs nothing more than salt and pepper. Now that
we'd found a dependable cooking method, we could serve this
once-a-year roast with confidence. (less)


For a roast that's as pink, juicy, and tender at the surface as it is
in the center, sear it first, then roast it long and low.


Serves 6 to 8


Remember, even a day or two of aging in the refrigerator will help.

Ingredients

1 first-cut beef rib roast , 3 ribs (about 7 pounds), set at room
temperature for 3 hours, tied twice between the rib bones (see
illustration below)
Salt and ground black pepper

Instructions

1. Adjust oven rack to low position and heat oven to 200 degrees. Heat
large roasting pan over two burners set at medium-high heat. Place
roast in hot pan and cook on all sides until nicely browned and about
1/2 cup fat has rendered, 6 to 8 minutes.


2. Remove roast from pan. Set wire rack in pan, then set roast on
rack. Generously season with salt and pepper.


3. Place roast in oven and roast until meat registers 130 degrees (for
medium-rare), about 3 1/2 hours (or about 30 minutes per pound). Let
stand 20 minutes (a bit longer is fine) before serving.


4. Transfer to cutting board and carve in accordance with the
instructions below.


Technique
Tying and Carving the Prime Rib

1. To carve, remove the twine and set the roast on a cutting board,
rib bones perpendicular to the board. Using a carving fork to hold the
roast in place, cut along the rib bones to sever the meat from the
bones.


2. Set the roast cut side down; carve the meat across the grain into
thick slices.


We didn't tie the first few prime ribs that we roasted. We found out
pretty quickly, though, that unless the roast was tied, the outer
layer of meat pulled away from the rib-eye muscle, causing the roast
to look a little unattractive. Separated from the main roast, this
outer flap of meat also tended to overcook. To solve this problem
easily, tie the roast at both ends running parallel to the bone.

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meat is inferior to pork.
- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927
Mark Twain

Gene


You cooked it in the oven?? You must have moved your oven outside onto the
patio. It's somewhat of interest that your post immediately follows the "afb
FAQ" post.

I've never had the guts to risk my investment by browning directly the cut
ends of a prime rib. I'm going to try it next time. I usually paint the cut
ends with rendered bacon fat. I'll brown the cut ends in bacon fat, and save
the non fatty part of the pan residue for the Yorkshire pudding. I would
leave the other surfaces alone to render the fat and drippings that are the
principal ingredients of the Yorkshire pudding you make with the roast. I'm
going to, as always, roast the standing rib indirectly on the Weber at 250F,
though only to 120-125F. The temp will rise five degrees during the resting
period while you're making the "Yorkie".

I think your point about the "butt end" cut is a very good one. The last
roast we had, however, was a bit on the dry side. I always look carefully at
the piece of meat I'm going to buy. It needs to have enough fat.

I'd to try the above on The WSM smoker. However. with the water pan full,
the temp. doesn't quite reach 250F.

Kent


Kent


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 01:27 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,346
Default Prime Rib


I've never had the guts to risk my investment by browning directly the cut
ends of a prime rib.


ever had the guts to trim your posts?

joe
dark as shit, alaska


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 02:09 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,741
Default Prime Rib

On Dec 19, 6:59*pm, Gene wrote:
Got this fromAmerica's Test Kitchen, have usedit,and find thatitmakes the best prime ribIhave ever had.

Iageit for 7 days.Also,Icut the meat off the riband THEN TIEITBACK ONTO THE BONES beforeIroast*it. This wayit holds up wellandis easier to slice before serving.

Buy the ribs thatare the 10,11,and 12th ribsas theyare notafattybut still fatty enough.

Why this recipe works:

Most of us cook prime rib only onceayear,if that,and don’t want torisk experimenting with the cooking method—especially when the resultsare no better than mediocre. We thought thataspecial-occasion roastdeserved betterand wanted to find the best way to get the juicy,tender, rosy meat that prime rib should have. The principal questionfor roasting prime rib was oven temperature,and our research turnedupawide range of recommendations. Most delivered meat that waswell-done on the outside butincreasingly rare toward the center—nottoo bad, but not exactly great. Surprisingly, the roast we cookedatatemperature of only 250 degrees was rosy from the centerall the wayout.Additionally,it retained more juice thanaroast cookedatahigher temperature,and theinternal temperature rose less duringresting, so we had more control over the final degree of doneness.Searing before roasting gave usacrusty brown exterior. Forseasoning, prime rib needs nothing more than saltand pepper. Now thatwe’d foundadependable cooking method, we could serve thisonce-a-year roast with confidence. (less)

Foraroast that'sas pink, juicy,and tenderat the surfaceasitisin the center, searit first, then roastit longand low.

Serves 6 to 8

Remember, evenaday or two ofagingin the refrigerator will help.

Ingredients

1 first-cut beef rib roast , 3 ribs (about 7 pounds), setat roomtemperature for 3 hours, tied twice between the rib bones (seeillustration below)* Saltand ground black pepper

Instructions

1.Adjust oven rack to low positionand heat oven to 200 degrees. Heatlarge roasting pan over two burners setat medium-high heat. Placeroastin hot panand cook onall sides until nicely brownedandabout1/2 cup fat has rendered, 6 to 8 minutes.

2. Remove roast from pan. Set wire rackin pan, then set roast onrack. Generously season with saltand pepper.

3. Place roastin ovenand roast until meat registers 130 degrees (formedium-rare),about 3 1/2 hours (orabout 30 minutes per pound). Letstand 20 minutes (abit longeris fine) before serving.

4. Transfer to cutting boardand carveinaccordance with theinstructions below.

TechniqueTyingand Carving the Prime Rib

1. To carve, remove the twineand set the roast onacutting board,rib bones perpendicular to the board. Usingacarving fork to hold theroastin place, cutalong the rib bones to sever the meat from the
bones.

2. Set the roast cut side down; carve the meatacross the grainintothick slices.

We didn't tie the first few prime ribs that we roasted. We found outpretty quickly, though, that unless the roast was tied, the outerlayer of meat pulledaway from the rib-eye muscle, causing the roastto lookalittle unattractive. Separated from the main roast, thisouter flap of meatalso tended to overcook. To solve this problemeasily, tie the roastat both ends running parallel to the bone.

Itisasolemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meatisinferior to pork.- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927Mark Twain

Gene


This is from my restaurant days. Using a convection oven.
Put prime rib in a convection oven that has been preheated to 500F.
Leave at that temp for 1/2 hour.
Turn down heat to 200F.
Roast until desired doneness is reached. If memory serves correct our
roasts were not in that long. Perhaps 2 to 3 hours? It's been well
over three decades. 1977. I was a big ole' night chef working the
Maître d'Hôtel Butter station in a big ole' steak house. My assistant
would pass the finished steak to me, and I'd put a lil' ole' scoop of
Maître d'Hôtel Butter on top. Needless to say, the pace was fast and
furious.
Also, if you're not using a convection oven, you will need more
time.
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 02:26 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default Prime Rib

On Mon, 19 Dec 2011 18:28:55 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2011 17:59:43 -0600, Gene wrote:

Buy the ribs that are the 10,11, and 12th ribs as they are not a fatty
but still fatty enough.


Good. Save the large ends, ribs 6-8, for me. I love those muscles
that surrounds the "eye" (longissimus dorsi?) of the roast, which is
smaller in the large end. The small end of the rib roast (10-12) is
practically all eye. Nyeh.

This is why I like the (true) chuck eye steaks as well.

-sw


10-12 is lots a fat too. But that's OK if that is what you want.

Gene

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meat is inferior to pork.
- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927
Mark Twain

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 02:37 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default Prime Rib

snip

You cooked it in the oven?? You must have moved your oven outside onto the
patio. It's somewhat of interest that your post immediately follows the "afb
FAQ" post.


WTF are you talking about on both points?


I've never had the guts to risk my investment by browning directly the cut
ends of a prime rib.


Then learn how to cook.

I'm going to try it next time. I usually paint the cut
ends with rendered bacon fat. I'll brown the cut ends in bacon fat, and save
the non fatty part of the pan residue for the Yorkshire pudding. I would
leave the other surfaces alone to render the fat and drippings that are the
principal ingredients of the Yorkshire pudding you make with the roast. I'm
going to, as always, roast the standing rib indirectly on the Weber at 250F,
though only to 120-125F. The temp will rise five degrees during the resting
period while you're making the "Yorkie".


Nobody asked about Yorkshire pudding.


I think your point about the "butt end" cut is a very good one. The last
roast we had, however, was a bit on the dry side. I always look carefully at
the piece of meat I'm going to buy. It needs to have enough fat.

I'd to try the above on The WSM smoker. However. with the water pan full,
the temp. doesn't quite reach 250F.


Try sand


Kent


Kent


Gene

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meat is inferior to pork.
- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927
Mark Twain

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 02:38 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default Prime Rib

On Mon, 19 Dec 2011 16:27:48 -0900, "just joe"
wrote:


I've never had the guts to risk my investment by browning directly the cut
ends of a prime rib.


ever had the guts to trim your posts?

joe
dark as shit, alaska


They are in the garage in the brining turkey.

Gene

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meat is inferior to pork.
- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927
Mark Twain

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 02:52 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default Prime Rib

snip
This is from my restaurant days. Using a convection oven.
Put prime rib in a convection oven that has been preheated to 500F.
Leave at that temp for 1/2 hour.
Turn down heat to 200F.
Roast until desired doneness is reached. If memory serves correct our
roasts were not in that long. Perhaps 2 to 3 hours? It's been well
over three decades. 1977. I was a big ole' night chef working the
Maître d'Hôtel Butter station in a big ole' steak house. My assistant
would pass the finished steak to me, and I'd put a lil' ole' scoop of
Maître d'Hôtel Butter on top. Needless to say, the pace was fast and
furious.
Also, if you're not using a convection oven, you will need more
time.


Yep, that is the TRADITIONAL way to do it. It worked well. I just
prefer the ATK way of doing it. I find it produces a more even and
consistent result. The 500F for 1/2 hour in effect brows the roast.


Gene

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meat is inferior to pork.
- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927
Mark Twain

  #9 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 03:00 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default Prime Rib

snip

I consider the meat composition more important than the fat content.

-sw


Fine. Then eat it.

Gene

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meat is inferior to pork.
- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927
Mark Twain

  #10 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 03:10 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,739
Default Prime Rib


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 19 Dec 2011 20:26:07 -0600, Gene wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2011 18:28:55 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2011 17:59:43 -0600, Gene wrote:

Buy the ribs that are the 10,11, and 12th ribs as they are not a fatty
but still fatty enough.

Good. Save the large ends, ribs 6-8, for me. I love those muscles
that surrounds the "eye" (longissimus dorsi?) of the roast, which is
smaller in the large end. The small end of the rib roast (10-12) is
practically all eye. Nyeh.

This is why I like the (true) chuck eye steaks as well.

-sw


10-12 is lots a fat too. But that's OK if that is what you want.


I consider the meat composition more important than the fat content.



who doesn't?


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 04:48 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default Prime Rib

snip



I find the instructions overly complicated. Lemme guess - Cooks
Illustrated./ATK? They're good at making up overly complicated
solutions to non-problems.

-sw


Oh WTF Steve. I said it was from ATK from the start. I like it. It
works well.

You don't like it? Ignore it.

Why does everything seem to have to be some kind of contest or
argument with you?

Gene

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meat is inferior to pork.
- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927
Mark Twain

  #12 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 04:50 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default Prime Rib

On Mon, 19 Dec 2011 21:57:25 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Mon, 19 Dec 2011 21:00:51 -0600, Gene wrote:

snip

I consider the meat composition more important than the fat content.

Fine. Then eat it.


I don't need your blessing to do so. I'm just expressing my
preference. No reason to get snotty.

-sw


I'm not getting snotty. I'm just saying to each his/her own.

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 05:32 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,620
Default Prime Rib

he does that to hide the fact he can't follow simple instructions, Lee
"Gene" wrote in message
news
snip



I find the instructions overly complicated. Lemme guess - Cooks
Illustrated./ATK? They're good at making up overly complicated
solutions to non-problems.

-sw


Oh WTF Steve. I said it was from ATK from the start. I like it. It
works well.

You don't like it? Ignore it.

Why does everything seem to have to be some kind of contest or
argument with you?

Gene

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meat is inferior to pork.
- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927
Mark Twain



  #14 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 05:41 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default Prime Rib

snip
Oh, so that means only YOU can share YOUR opinion? I suppose we
should all be bowing down to Kent, too?

I didn't blame the errors in this on you, so don't take it too ****ing
personally, OK?

Sheesh, dude. Take a pill.

-sw


OK, maybe I over reacted a bit. Can't really blame me after the last
time you craped all over me. If you recall, you had mistaken me for
someone else. It went on for some time.

No harm, no foul.

Gene

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man's meat is inferior to pork.
- More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927
Mark Twain

  #15 (permalink)  
Old 20-12-2011, 05:49 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,739
Default Prime Rib



Your instructions are defective. They say 250F in the introduction,
then the directions say 200F. 200F is too low and unnecessary. And
adds about 2 hours onto the cook time at which time the moisture is
lost and safety becomes an issue.



I am curious if ATK said 200 or 250 degrees.


 




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