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Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

Skin Treatment on Smoked Turkey


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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 15-11-2003, 08:28 PM
Davis
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Default Skin Treatment on Smoked Turkey

Hi all

I've been basting with margarine with each new addition of coals
(about every 1.5 hours) while smoking a 12 pound turkey, but the skin
is still coming out very dark and leathery. Any suggestions? Thanks
in advance for your input.
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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 16-11-2003, 11:11 AM
jmcquown
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Default Skin Treatment on Smoked Turkey

Davis wrote:
Hi all

I've been basting with margarine with each new addition of coals
(about every 1.5 hours) while smoking a 12 pound turkey, but the skin
is still coming out very dark and leathery. Any suggestions? Thanks
in advance for your input.


It's probably taking FOREVER to smoke that turkey because you aren't suppose
to mess with it every hour, let alone baste it. Margarine? Yikes! If you
have a decent smoker, you shouldn't have to replenish the coals and hickory,
apple or whatever wood every 1.5 hours. And the water pan should keep the
skin of the turkey moist. So I'm not sure what you're doing....

However to address the colour of the skin, smoked turkey has a skin the
colour of a good mahogany. And yes, it will appear wrinkled. But, if you
keep the water pan filled, it will not be dry, tough or leathery.

Jill


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 17-11-2003, 02:03 PM
Jack Curry
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Default Skin Treatment on Smoked Turkey

jmcquown wrote:
Davis wrote:
Hi all

I've been basting with margarine with each new addition of coals
(about every 1.5 hours) while smoking a 12 pound turkey, but the skin
is still coming out very dark and leathery. Any suggestions? Thanks
in advance for your input.


It's probably taking FOREVER to smoke that turkey because you aren't
suppose to mess with it every hour, let alone baste it. Margarine?
Yikes! If you have a decent smoker, you shouldn't have to replenish
the coals and hickory, apple or whatever wood every 1.5 hours. And
the water pan should keep the skin of the turkey moist. So I'm not
sure what you're doing....

However to address the colour of the skin, smoked turkey has a skin
the colour of a good mahogany. And yes, it will appear wrinkled.
But, if you keep the water pan filled, it will not be dry, tough or
leathery.

Jill


Sorry Jill, but that's not so. A water pan will make little or no
difference in retaining moisture in the meat (it just acts as a heat
deflector and a pan full of sand works equally well). Slow smoking a turkey
is going to result in a rubbery-textured skin, which is the price paid for
this method of cooking a bird.
OP, just toss the skin and enjoy the meat.
Jack Curry


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 17-11-2003, 03:38 PM
BOB
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Default Skin Treatment on Smoked Turkey

Jack Curry typed:
jmcquown wrote:
Davis wrote:
Hi all

I've been basting with margarine with each new addition of coals
(about every 1.5 hours) while smoking a 12 pound turkey, but the skin
is still coming out very dark and leathery. Any suggestions? Thanks
in advance for your input.


It's probably taking FOREVER to smoke that turkey because you aren't
suppose to mess with it every hour, let alone baste it. Margarine?
Yikes! If you have a decent smoker, you shouldn't have to replenish
the coals and hickory, apple or whatever wood every 1.5 hours. And
the water pan should keep the skin of the turkey moist. So I'm not
sure what you're doing....

However to address the colour of the skin, smoked turkey has a skin
the colour of a good mahogany. And yes, it will appear wrinkled.
But, if you keep the water pan filled, it will not be dry, tough or
leathery.

Jill


Sorry Jill, but that's not so. A water pan will make little or no
difference in retaining moisture in the meat (it just acts as a heat
deflector and a pan full of sand works equally well). Slow smoking a turkey
is going to result in a rubbery-textured skin, which is the price paid for
this method of cooking a bird.
OP, just toss the skin and enjoy the meat.
Jack Curry


You can also raise the cooking temps during the last 1/2 hour to 45 min to try to
crisp the skin, but it may not work. You also need to take this into
consideration when you calculate the cooking time vs internal temps (takes
practice) or you will overcook and dry out the bird. Back to "toss the skin"
until you have enough real experience to get a moist bird with crispy skin.

BOB


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 17-11-2003, 05:43 PM
frohe
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Posts: n/a
Default Skin Treatment on Smoked Turkey

Davis wrote:
I've been basting with margarine with each new addition of coals
(about every 1.5 hours) while smoking a 12 pound turkey, but the skin
is still coming out very dark and leathery. Any suggestions? Thanks
in advance for your input.


Best thing to do with smoked turkey skin is feed it to the dogs. It don't
crisp up like chicken does when you boost the cook temp at the end of the
cookin time.
--
-frohe
Life is too short to be in a hurry


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 17-11-2003, 06:18 PM
JD
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Posts: n/a
Default Skin Treatment on Smoked Turkey

"frohe" wrote in message

Davis wrote:
I've been basting with margarine with each new addition of coals
(about every 1.5 hours) while smoking a 12 pound turkey, but the skin
is still coming out very dark and leathery. Any suggestions? Thanks
in advance for your input.


Best thing to do with smoked turkey skin is feed it to the dogs. It
don't crisp up like chicken does when you boost the cook temp at the
end of the cookin time.


I've been pondering this very question. I've seen how you can brown a
merigue with a small kitchen torch. I'm sorely tempted to take the leaf
burner that I fire up the pit with and turn it on the smoked chickens and
turkeys to see if it doesn't crisp things up a bit.

JD


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 17-11-2003, 07:37 PM
Jack Curry
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Posts: n/a
Default Skin Treatment on Smoked Turkey


"JD" wrote in message
...
"frohe" wrote in message

Davis wrote:
I've been basting with margarine with each new addition of coals
(about every 1.5 hours) while smoking a 12 pound turkey, but the skin
is still coming out very dark and leathery. Any suggestions? Thanks
in advance for your input.


Best thing to do with smoked turkey skin is feed it to the dogs. It
don't crisp up like chicken does when you boost the cook temp at the
end of the cookin time.


I've been pondering this very question. I've seen how you can brown a
merigue with a small kitchen torch. I'm sorely tempted to take the leaf
burner that I fire up the pit with and turn it on the smoked chickens and
turkeys to see if it doesn't crisp things up a bit.

JD


I did that years ago with a heat gun with modest success. It raises
blisters on the skin and crisps it somewhat, but it doesn't brown much at
all.
Jack Curry


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 18-11-2003, 01:37 PM
Brick
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Posts: n/a
Default Skin Treatment on Smoked Turkey

snipped just about everybody in the group

Slow smoking a turkey
is going to result in a rubbery-textured skin, which is the price

paid for
this method of cooking a bird.
OP, just toss the skin and enjoy the meat.
Jack Curry


I gave up on chicken skin. My best effort resulted in a texture
somewhat like celluloid. The meat didn't last long enough to
form much of an opinion. The table ended up littered with
bones and skin. The only comments were muttered curses
about a stingy host that wouldn't cook enough to go around.
Fortunately it was BYOB so they couldn't bitch about that.

Brick( smoked chicken skin sux )


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 19-11-2003, 03:42 PM
shotgun*@osbaccess.com
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Posts: n/a
Default Skin Treatment on Smoked Turkey

(snip....)
Best thing to do with smoked turkey skin is feed it to the dogs.

(snip....)
--
-frohe



Say,
Those must be outdoor dogs. ;o}

shotgun





 



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