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Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 17-04-2009, 06:16 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 516
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?

Any thoughts about slow cooking Cornish game hens? What temp? How long?
Do you stuff. Do you cut and flatten it for grilling? Have any done the beer
can
technique with tiny fowl?
Thanks for any thoughts,

Ed



Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 17-04-2009, 10:35 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 1,360
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?


On 17-Apr-2009, "Theron" wrote:

Any thoughts about slow cooking Cornish game hens? What temp? How long?
Do you stuff. Do you cut and flatten it for grilling? Have any done the
beer
can
technique with tiny fowl?
Thanks for any thoughts,

Ed


I wouldn't do it. Not a candidate for slow cooking.

--
Brick WA7ERO (Youth is wasted on young people)
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2009, 01:02 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 151
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?


"Theron" wrote in message
...
Any thoughts about slow cooking Cornish game hens? What temp? How long?
Do you stuff. Do you cut and flatten it for grilling? Have any done the
beer can
technique with tiny fowl?
Thanks for any thoughts,

Ed




Just like the way you like to grill chicken, only 1/3 the time. I
personally like them stuffed with something, onion, citrus, herbs, etc and
tied shut. Throw the stuffing away before serving. Injecting would be
good.

Spud


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2009, 03:42 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 6,171
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?


"Theron" wrote in message
...
Any thoughts about slow cooking Cornish game hens? What temp? How long?
Do you stuff. Do you cut and flatten it for grilling? Have any done the
beer can
technique with tiny fowl?
Thanks for any thoughts,

Ed


Same as any other chicken. I'd cook them at 350 to 400 with smoke or
spatchcock them on the grill.


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2009, 04:52 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,518
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?

Nunya Bidnits wrote:
In ,
Theron typed:
Any thoughts about slow cooking Cornish game hens? What temp? How
long?
Do you stuff. Do you cut and flatten it for grilling? Have any done
the beer can
technique with tiny fowl?
Thanks for any thoughts,

Ed


Cut and flatten = spatchcocking, and that's a good way to do small birds.

Personally I think the beer can is overrated. It tends to steam the bird and
make it mushy, and the skin doesn't crisp up very well.


I don't know how you cook your beer can chicken, but mine is never mushy
and the skin is always crispy. I made one on Tuesday on the gas grill
with off-set heat and the lid closed. We had the leftovers in chicken
enchiladas tonight.

Marinating or brining will put all the moisture you need into a bird, or
pieces for that matter, so it can be grilled or barbecued without drying
out.

MartyB in KC



--
Janet Wilder
way-the-heck-south Texas
spelling doesn't count
but cooking does
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2009, 09:01 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 260
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?

On Apr 17, 7:42*pm, "Ed Pawlowski" wrote:
"Theron" wrote in message



Same as any other chicken. *I'd cook them at 350 to 400 with smoke or
spatchcock them on the grill.


Best: Spatchocked and grilled over lump.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2009, 11:24 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 1,549
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?



"Duwop" wrote in message
...
On Apr 17, 7:42 pm, "Ed Pawlowski" wrote:
"Theron" wrote in message



Same as any other chicken. I'd cook them at 350 to 400 with smoke or
spatchcock them on the grill.


Best: Spatchocked and grilled over lump.


Durn y'all! Now I have to go get one

I've had them smoked before. They're great that way. I just gauged
doneness with the "leg wiggle" factor.

I can get them here at one store for $2.49 each. All the other stores sell
them in twin packs. Can't remember the price on the twins because I don't
buy from people who force me to buy more than I want.

TFM®

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2009, 04:11 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 229
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?

In alt.food.barbecue, Denny Wheeler wrote:

I'd grill 'em or smoke-roast (350 or higher); I don't consider that to
be barbecuing, really. It sure ain't low and slow. But it does yield
a tasty bird.


I agree. I also agree with the spatchcocking idea. That's how I used to
do them, after soaking them in a lime/onion/chili marinade.

And if you instead cook them with high, smoky, indirect heat, it's likely
that they will get nice crispy delicious skin. If you use a lot of
charcoal in a Weber Kettle, but dump it all on one side, you can cook
those birds at 400+ on the far side of the grill and they'll turn out
great.

In fact, my nouth is watering and I'm wanting to go to the supermarket to
get some Cornish Hens and cook them with salt, pepper, and some ancho
flakes on the skin, and maybe some garlic in the cavity.
Mmmmmmmmmm....that might be good with sugar maple chunks mixed in with the
lump.

--
The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so
certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts.
-- Bertrand Russell

  #9 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2009, 04:13 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 229
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?

In alt.food.barbecue, spud wrote:


I
personally like them stuffed with something, onion, citrus, herbs, etc and
tied shut. Throw the stuffing away before serving.


That's often what I use in a Thanksgiving Turkey when I smoke it.


--
The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so
certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts.
-- Bertrand Russell

  #10 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2009, 05:06 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,360
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?


On 18-Apr-2009, =?iso-8859-1?B?VEZNrg==?=
wrote:

Xref: unlimited.usenetmonster.com alt.food.barbecue:142133



"Duwop" wrote in message
...
On Apr 17, 7:42 pm, "Ed Pawlowski" wrote:
"Theron" wrote in message



Same as any other chicken. I'd cook them at 350 to 400 with smoke or
spatchcock them on the grill.


Best: Spatchocked and grilled over lump.


Durn y'all! Now I have to go get one

I've had them smoked before. They're great that way. I just gauged
doneness with the "leg wiggle" factor.

I can get them here at one store for $2.49 each. All the other stores
sell
them in twin packs. Can't remember the price on the twins because I
don't
buy from people who force me to buy more than I want.

TFM®


$2.49 is a good price TFM®. They run to about $6.00/pair in the places
I shop. They're a little less at BJ's wholesale. I got some real scrawny
ones for about your price, but I wouldn't buy them again.

--
Brick WA7ERO (Youth is wasted on young people)
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2009, 07:28 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 304
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?

On Sat, 18 Apr 2009 13:18:24 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
wrote:

In ,
Janet Wilder typed:
Nunya Bidnits wrote:
In ,
Theron typed:
Any thoughts about slow cooking Cornish game hens? What temp? How
long?
Do you stuff. Do you cut and flatten it for grilling? Have any done
the beer can
technique with tiny fowl?
Thanks for any thoughts,

Ed

Cut and flatten = spatchcocking, and that's a good way to do small
birds.

Personally I think the beer can is overrated. It tends to steam the
bird and make it mushy, and the skin doesn't crisp up very well.


I don't know how you cook your beer can chicken, but mine is never
mushy and the skin is always crispy. I made one on Tuesday on the gas
grill with off-set heat and the lid closed. We had the leftovers in
chicken enchiladas tonight.


What's in the beer can?


Good question--in fact, I'd like to get a lot more advice and info
from you, Janet! I just bought one of the stands for beer can chicken,
and I'd like to try making my first, but not with beer in the can.

Would you consider posting your recipe and method for beer can
chicken?

Thanks much! (just learning to grill, not planning to bbq)

Desideria
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2009, 03:18 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,518
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?

Nunya Bidnits wrote:
In ,
Janet Wilder typed:
Nunya Bidnits wrote:
In ,
Theron typed:
Any thoughts about slow cooking Cornish game hens? What temp? How
long?
Do you stuff. Do you cut and flatten it for grilling? Have any done
the beer can
technique with tiny fowl?
Thanks for any thoughts,

Ed
Cut and flatten = spatchcocking, and that's a good way to do small
birds.

Personally I think the beer can is overrated. It tends to steam the
bird and make it mushy, and the skin doesn't crisp up very well.

I don't know how you cook your beer can chicken, but mine is never
mushy and the skin is always crispy. I made one on Tuesday on the gas
grill with off-set heat and the lid closed. We had the leftovers in
chicken enchiladas tonight.


What's in the beer can?


Sometimes it's beer. This time it was lemon-lime soda.

--
Janet Wilder
way-the-heck-south Texas
spelling doesn't count
but cooking does
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2009, 03:34 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,518
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?

Desideria wrote:
On Sat, 18 Apr 2009 13:18:24 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
wrote:

In ,
Janet Wilder typed:
Nunya Bidnits wrote:
In ,
Theron typed:
Any thoughts about slow cooking Cornish game hens? What temp? How
long?
Do you stuff. Do you cut and flatten it for grilling? Have any done
the beer can
technique with tiny fowl?
Thanks for any thoughts,

Ed
Cut and flatten = spatchcocking, and that's a good way to do small
birds.

Personally I think the beer can is overrated. It tends to steam the
bird and make it mushy, and the skin doesn't crisp up very well.
I don't know how you cook your beer can chicken, but mine is never
mushy and the skin is always crispy. I made one on Tuesday on the gas
grill with off-set heat and the lid closed. We had the leftovers in
chicken enchiladas tonight.

What's in the beer can?


Good question--in fact, I'd like to get a lot more advice and info
from you, Janet! I just bought one of the stands for beer can chicken,
and I'd like to try making my first, but not with beer in the can.

Would you consider posting your recipe and method for beer can
chicken?

Thanks much! (just learning to grill, not planning to bbq)

Desideria



If I'm not using beer, I like using lemon-lime soda, like 7-UP. I don't
think what's in the can flavors the chicken at all, but I was making it
for my grand girls who are visiting, so I used the soda. Truthfully, if
I start with half a can of liquid, at the end there is pretty much half
a can of liquid still left.

I think that most of the flavor comes from the rub that you put on the
outside of the chicken. I make one with granulated garlic, onion powder,
sweet paprika and Bell's® poultry seasoning. I don't cook with salt.
I also put a small potato or onion in the hole on top of the chicken and
I tie the wings down by encircling the chicken with white cotton
trussing twine.

I stand the chicken holder in a heavy-duty foil pan so the fat doesn't
get in the grill.

I keep the temperature (as read on the lid thermometer) at about 325°
F. It seems to be the best temp for roasting the chicken. The skin gets
crisp.

I will start it off with the breast facing the side of the grill
generating the heat. Turn it after 40 minutes then turn it back after 20
minutes for the rest of the cooking time. I do use an instant read
thermometer, but you can also use the drumstick wiggle method to test
for done.

The chicken is juicy but not mushy. The skin gets nice and crispy. It
has become our family's preferred way to make a roast chicken.

Note: Bell's® is not available everywhere, so here is a copy cat recipe
for it.


* Exported from MasterCook *

Bells Poultry Seasoning copykat recipe

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Hints And Tips Poultry

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
9 tsp dried rosemary
8 1/4 tsp dried oregano
7 1/2 tsp dried sage
6 3/4 tsp ground dried ginger
6 tsp dried marjoram
5 1/4 tsp dried thyme
1 1/2 tsp ground black pepper

Mix together and grind to fine powder.

Description:
"My favorite poultry seasoning"
Yield:
"1 cup"





--
Janet Wilder
way-the-heck-south Texas
spelling doesn't count
but cooking does
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2009, 03:59 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 304
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?

On Sat, 18 Apr 2009 21:34:02 -0500, Janet Wilder
wrote:

Desideria wrote:
On Sat, 18 Apr 2009 13:18:24 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
wrote:

In ,
Janet Wilder typed:
Nunya Bidnits wrote:
In ,
Theron typed:
Any thoughts about slow cooking Cornish game hens? What temp? How
long?
Do you stuff. Do you cut and flatten it for grilling? Have any done
the beer can
technique with tiny fowl?
Thanks for any thoughts,

Ed
Cut and flatten = spatchcocking, and that's a good way to do small
birds.

Personally I think the beer can is overrated. It tends to steam the
bird and make it mushy, and the skin doesn't crisp up very well.
I don't know how you cook your beer can chicken, but mine is never
mushy and the skin is always crispy. I made one on Tuesday on the gas
grill with off-set heat and the lid closed. We had the leftovers in
chicken enchiladas tonight.
What's in the beer can?


Good question--in fact, I'd like to get a lot more advice and info
from you, Janet! I just bought one of the stands for beer can chicken,
and I'd like to try making my first, but not with beer in the can.

Would you consider posting your recipe and method for beer can
chicken?

Thanks much! (just learning to grill, not planning to bbq)

Desideria



If I'm not using beer, I like using lemon-lime soda, like 7-UP. I don't
think what's in the can flavors the chicken at all, but I was making it
for my grand girls who are visiting, so I used the soda. Truthfully, if
I start with half a can of liquid, at the end there is pretty much half
a can of liquid still left.

I think that most of the flavor comes from the rub that you put on the
outside of the chicken. I make one with granulated garlic, onion powder,
sweet paprika and Bell's® poultry seasoning. I don't cook with salt.
I also put a small potato or onion in the hole on top of the chicken and
I tie the wings down by encircling the chicken with white cotton
trussing twine.

I stand the chicken holder in a heavy-duty foil pan so the fat doesn't
get in the grill.

I keep the temperature (as read on the lid thermometer) at about 325°
F. It seems to be the best temp for roasting the chicken. The skin gets
crisp.

I will start it off with the breast facing the side of the grill
generating the heat. Turn it after 40 minutes then turn it back after 20
minutes for the rest of the cooking time. I do use an instant read
thermometer, but you can also use the drumstick wiggle method to test
for done.

The chicken is juicy but not mushy. The skin gets nice and crispy. It
has become our family's preferred way to make a roast chicken.

Note: Bell's® is not available everywhere, so here is a copy cat recipe
for it.


* Exported from MasterCook *

Bells Poultry Seasoning copykat recipe

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Hints And Tips Poultry

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
9 tsp dried rosemary
8 1/4 tsp dried oregano
7 1/2 tsp dried sage
6 3/4 tsp ground dried ginger
6 tsp dried marjoram
5 1/4 tsp dried thyme
1 1/2 tsp ground black pepper

Mix together and grind to fine powder.

Description:
"My favorite poultry seasoning"
Yield:
"1 cup"



Thanks, Janet!!! I really appreciate your help.


Desideria
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2009, 04:18 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 260
Default How do you barbecue Cornish game hens?

On Apr 18, 7:34*pm, Janet Wilder wrote:

I think that most of the flavor comes from the rub that you put on the
outside of the chicken


Right.

Hey, if that method helps you make a good chicken, more power to you.
Just don't ascribe things to the method that aren't usable in others
is all.

To put it plainly, some people seem to think there's something special
with this method which experienced cooks have found to be bogus. Which
just make this another method, nothing wrong with that. Unless you're
trying to sell something, which there was a lot of.

There are three goals when grilling chicken: doneness, edible skin and
"not overdone" or juicy.


There's a few methods that'll get ya there, beer can chicken is just
one.


 




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