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Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-06-2008, 02:34 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 124
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

I would like to do a large piece of meat low & slow on my gas grill as
my first attempt at "real" BBQ. Could anyone that has this experience
share some advice?

I would like to cook something that is tender and falls apart (my 1
year old son can't do steak yet, of course, no molars yet). So I'm
thinking a full rack of ribs as my first attempt or some other kind of
pork? (any ideas?)

My questions a

Do i preheat the grill for the first 10 mins? If yes, at what temp?
(low? medium? high?) Or since I am doing low & slow, do i just fire
the grill up on low and put the meat on the racks?

My gas grill has 3 burners, front to back. How many do I turn off, and
what setting (low, med, high) do I set the other burners to?

Let's say I want to do a full rack of ribs, I read something about
cutting off the membrane on the back of the ribs. Do you turn the meat
on the grill at all or just let it sit for X number of hours?

Do you need to baste at all?

Paul
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-06-2008, 04:17 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 124
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

On Jun 4, 9:34*am, meatnub wrote:
I would like to do a large piece of meat low & slow on my gas grill as
my first attempt at "real" BBQ. Could anyone that has this experience
share some advice?

I would like to cook something that is tender and falls apart (my 1
year old son can't do steak yet, of course, no molars yet). So I'm
thinking a full rack of ribs as my first attempt or some other kind of
pork? (any ideas?)

My questions a

Do i preheat the grill for the first 10 mins? If yes, at what temp?
(low? medium? high?) Or since I am doing low & slow, do i just fire
the grill up on low and put the meat on the racks?

My gas grill has 3 burners, front to back. How many do I turn off, and
what setting (low, med, high) do I set the other burners to?

Let's say I want to do a full rack of ribs, I read something about
cutting off the membrane on the back of the ribs. Do you turn the meat
on the grill at all or just let it sit for X number of hours?

Do you need to baste at all?

Paul


I found this old thread via Google groups:

"I will second that. In fact, as I write this, I am looking out the
window at my Genesis Silver B (natural gas model) on the deck, gently
smoking ribs at about 250 degrees for about 4 hours now. While the
Genesis doesn't provide any special smoking features (you asked about
smoking), I use the 'foil method', i.e., wrap wood chips in foil, make
a
small hole in the foil and place on top of the flavorizer (sp) bars.
I
usually place the meat at the back of the grill and only fire up the
front burner on low-med heat. Works great. Some folks like to just
throw in a larger, fist sized chunk of wood. "

So it seems if I want to do low & slow - and again hoping for some
input here - i put my food to the back , turn only the front burner on
(low-med) and use wood chips if i want (i'll be skipping this on my
first BBQ attempt).

Sound right? Now if it's ribs, 250 degrees for how many hours? What
determines the hours? Weight of meat?

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-06-2008, 05:24 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 935
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

meatnub wrote:
On Jun 4, 9:34 am, meatnub wrote:
I would like to do a large piece of meat low & slow on my gas grill as
my first attempt at "real" BBQ. Could anyone that has this experience
share some advice?


There's a TON of "how to" advice on hear.

I will re-post what I just posted to a different poster in the
"Advice on Gas barbecuing" threat currently going on....

"Welcome Charles and good luck. I will throw on caution out though for
your consideration should you decide to use bbq cooking methods on your
grill: pay attention to grease build up on the bottom of the unit. If
you don't you could potentially end up with a roaring fire in the bottom
one day. (don't ask how I know that. ;-) )
"

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-06-2008, 07:20 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,518
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

meatnub wrote:

Let's say I want to do a full rack of ribs, I read something about
cutting off the membrane on the back of the ribs. Do you turn the meat
on the grill at all or just let it sit for X number of hours?

Do you need to baste at all?


I did a full rack of ribs on the gas grill yesterday. The trick is to
use indirect heat, so if you have 3 burners, light one and put the meat
over the unlit burners. I put foil under my meat to prevent flare-up
from drippings. That's fine with a steak, but not with slow smoking.

The morning before I want to make the ribs, I rub them and put them in
foil in the fridge for a few hours.

I peel off the membrane, but it's really not a necessity. I don't think
it changes the taste or the eating, I just think its fun to peel it off.

I let my grill come up to 250 degrees F. Even 275 is okay, but I prefer 250.

From this group I learned the benefit of chunks as opposed to chips. I
wrap two good sized chunks of hickory in foil, punch a couple of small
holes in the foil, and place one over the burner with the flame. The
second one is to replace the first as it usually takes 2 chunks to do ribs.

After about 90 minutes, I turn my ribs from meaty-side up to meaty-side
down. That's usually when I change the chunk. After another 90 minutes I
check for done. If the meat is shrinking back on the bone and the ribs
are a mahogany color, they are done.

I never baste mine. I have found that most basting sauces contain sugar
and the sugar causes the meat to brown too quickly with the outside
getting cooked before the inside. I save basting sauces for things like
pork chops and fish that grill quickly.

Our ribs last night were fantastic. We each had a little puddle of our
favorite sauce for dipping on the side, but we hardly use much because
the rub gives the ribs such great flavor and they are never dry when
cooked slowly over low heat.

I hope you have a wonderful time with your new grill.








--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 04-06-2008, 09:02 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 124
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

On Jun 4, 12:24*pm, Steve Calvin wrote:
meatnub wrote:
On Jun 4, 9:34 am, meatnub wrote:
I would like to do a large piece of meat low & slow on my gas grill as
my first attempt at "real" BBQ. Could anyone that has this experience
share some advice?


There's a TON of "how to" advice on hear.

I will re-post what I just posted to a different poster in the
"Advice on Gas barbecuing" threat currently going on....

"Welcome Charles and good luck. *I will throw on caution out though for
your consideration should you decide to use bbq cooking methods on your
grill: pay attention to grease build up on the bottom of the unit. If
you don't you could potentially end up with a roaring fire in the bottom
one day. (don't ask how I know that. *;-) * *)
"


haha good advice. Well my weber has a grease catcher that also
releases into a drip pan. But I'll take heed of this and see what
happens.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 04-06-2008, 09:04 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 124
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

On Jun 4, 2:20*pm, Janet Wilder wrote:
meatnub wrote:
Let's say I want to do a full rack of ribs, I read something about
cutting off the membrane on the back of the ribs. Do you turn the meat
on the grill at all or just let it sit for X number of hours?


Do you need to baste at all?


I did a full rack of ribs on the gas grill yesterday. The trick is to
use indirect heat, so if you have 3 burners, light one and put the meat
over the unlit burners. *I put foil under my meat to prevent flare-up
from drippings. That's fine with a steak, but not with slow smoking.

The morning before I want to make the ribs, I rub them and put them in
foil in the fridge for a few hours.

I peel off the membrane, but it's really not a necessity. I don't think
it changes the taste or the eating, I just think its fun to peel it off.

I let my grill come up to 250 degrees F. Even 275 is okay, but I prefer 250.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 06-06-2008, 05:31 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,008
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

On Jun 5, 7:53*pm, Denny Wheeler
wrote:
On Wed, 4 Jun 2008 13:04:07 -0700 (PDT), meatnub
wrote:

whole lotta snippin' goin' on





On Jun 4, 2:20*pm, Janet Wilder wrote:
meatnub wrote:
Let's say I want to do a full rack of ribs, I read something about
cutting off the membrane on the back of the ribs. Do you turn the meat
on the grill at all or just let it sit for X number of hours?


Do you need to baste at all?


I did a full rack of ribs on the gas grill yesterday. The trick is to
use indirect heat, so if you have 3 burners, light one and put the meat
over the unlit burners. *I put foil under my meat to prevent flare-up
from drippings. That's fine with a steak, but not with slow smoking.


The morning before I want to make the ribs, I rub them and put them in
foil in the fridge for a few hours.


I peel off the membrane, but it's really not a necessity. I don't think
it changes the taste or the eating, I just think its fun to peel it off..


I let my grill come up to 250 degrees F. Even 275 is okay, but I prefer 250.


*From this group I learned the benefit of chunks as opposed to chips. I
wrap two good sized chunks of hickory in foil, punch a couple of small
holes in the foil, and place one over the burner with the flame. The
second one is to replace the first as it usually takes 2 chunks to do ribs.


After about 90 minutes, I turn my ribs from meaty-side up to meaty-side
down. That's usually when I change the chunk. After another 90 minutes I
check for done. If the meat is shrinking back on the bone and the ribs
are a mahogany color, they are done.


I never baste mine. I have found that most basting sauces contain sugar
and the sugar causes the meat to brown too quickly with the outside
getting cooked before the inside. I save basting sauces for things like
pork chops and fish that grill quickly.


Our ribs last night were fantastic. We each had a little puddle of our
favorite sauce for dipping on the side, but we hardly use much because
the rub gives the ribs such great flavor and they are never dry when
cooked slowly over low heat.


Gotcha. Thanks so much I will try this out for my ribs this weekend! I
can't wait.


Ok so the key is 250 degrees. So I'll set my one burner on low or med-
low until I get that steady temperature.


250 is fine. *So is 225, so is 275, so is 300 or 325--iirc, Big Jim
(regular here who is a pro) does most if not all of his Q at around
325-350.

As to being done--I'm surprised I get to be first with this:
It's done when it's done.
That's what I and many many others have been (truthfully) told here
about barbecue. *Ribs, butts, brisket--the times are variable; you
could buy two same-size Boston butts from the same lot at the store,
and have one take a lot longer than the other. *Ribs the same way,
though IME somewhat less variation, mainly due to ribs being
comparatively thin.

I've had ribs take 3 1/2 hours and I've had 'em take 5+ hours.

Two ways--and I think it's best to combine 'em--to tell when ribs are
done (btw, I hope you'll do SPARE ribs not baby backs--spares are a
far better deal as far as meat for the money, and they're a lot more
forgiving than babybacks):
(1)The meat pulls away from the ends of the bones, usually 1/4 to 1/2
inch or so. *
(2) Bend the rack of ribs; if done, the meat will crack between a
couple of the bones.

(small disclaimer--I've never cooked on a gas grill; charcoal grill or
gas-fired smoker)


Man knows his shit. Learned a few things from Denny over the years, we
all got something to share and learn from each other, that's why we're
here.

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 06-06-2008, 09:13 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

On Jun 4, 2:20*pm, Janet Wilder wrote:
meatnub wrote:
Let's say I want to do a full rack of ribs, I read something about
cutting off the membrane on the back of the ribs. Do you turn the meat
on the grill at all or just let it sit for X number of hours?


Do you need to baste at all?


I did a full rack of ribs on the gas grill yesterday. The trick is to
use indirect heat, so if you have 3 burners, light one and put the meat
over the unlit burners. *I put foil under my meat to prevent flare-up
from drippings. That's fine with a steak, but not with slow smoking.

The morning before I want to make the ribs, I rub them and put them in
foil in the fridge for a few hours.

I peel off the membrane, but it's really not a necessity. I don't think
it changes the taste or the eating, I just think its fun to peel it off.

I let my grill come up to 250 degrees F. Even 275 is okay, but I prefer 250.

  #9 (permalink)  
Old 06-06-2008, 09:18 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

On Jun 5, 10:53*pm, Denny Wheeler
wrote:

250 is fine. *So is 225, so is 275, so is 300 or 325--iirc, Big Jim
(regular here who is a pro) does most if not all of his Q at around
325-350.

As to being done--I'm surprised I get to be first with this:
It's done when it's done.
That's what I and many many others have been (truthfully) told here
about barbecue. *Ribs, butts, brisket--the times are variable; you
could buy two same-size Boston butts from the same lot at the store,
and have one take a lot longer than the other. *Ribs the same way,
though IME somewhat less variation, mainly due to ribs being
comparatively thin.

I've had ribs take 3 1/2 hours and I've had 'em take 5+ hours.

Two ways--and I think it's best to combine 'em--to tell when ribs are
done (btw, I hope you'll do SPARE ribs not baby backs--spares are a
far better deal as far as meat for the money, and they're a lot more
forgiving than babybacks):
(1)The meat pulls away from the ends of the bones, usually 1/4 to 1/2
inch or so. *
(2) Bend the rack of ribs; if done, the meat will crack between a
couple of the bones.

(small disclaimer--I've never cooked on a gas grill; charcoal grill or
gas-fired smoker)

I don't turn ribs. *Nor do I baste (mop) them. *What I almost always
do is brush on a glazing sauce right at the end of the cook. *I like
this one:http://www.dannysbbq.com/recipes.asp?rid=9
(Danny Gaulden is a well-known, highly thought of bbq pitmaster)

If you click the 'recipes' link there, you'll find some excellent
recipes, including Danny's Rib Rub, of which I'm quite fond.
(it calls for 1 TBSP of cayenne--I'm a wimp, and use 1/3 or 1/2 that
much)

Now I'm off to find out about where to get chunks of hickory...


Walmart, among many other places, sells bags of hickory chunks--also
easily found are mesquite chunks. *If all you find is hickory *chips*
wrap 'em in foil and poke a hole or two, as others described.

Good luck, and enjoy. *(the 'enjoy' is the important part!)

"Every single religion that has a monotheistic god
winds up persecuting someone else."
-Philip Pullman
--
-denny-
(not as curmudgeonly as I useta be)- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Thanks Denny!

Gonna just take some first hand experience to see the doneness of the
ribs or any meat. Just trying to retain all this info.

I've been reading up on the chunks of wood - put 1 in tinfoil, poke
some holes in it, put it over the weber's flavorizer bars. some people
change the chunks during the cooking time i imagine.

I wonder if I should be putting a drip pan filled with water under the
ribs (on the flavorizer bars under the grill grates) ? i see some
people doing this.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 07-06-2008, 02:04 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,518
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

Paul the Q noob wrote:
On Jun 4, 2:20 pm, Janet Wilder wrote:
meatnub wrote:
Let's say I want to do a full rack of ribs, I read something about
cutting off the membrane on the back of the ribs. Do you turn the meat
on the grill at all or just let it sit for X number of hours?
Do you need to baste at all?

I did a full rack of ribs on the gas grill yesterday. The trick is to
use indirect heat, so if you have 3 burners, light one and put the meat
over the unlit burners. I put foil under my meat to prevent flare-up
from drippings. That's fine with a steak, but not with slow smoking.

The morning before I want to make the ribs, I rub them and put them in
foil in the fridge for a few hours.

I peel off the membrane, but it's really not a necessity. I don't think
it changes the taste or the eating, I just think its fun to peel it off.

I let my grill come up to 250 degrees F. Even 275 is okay, but I prefer 250.

From this group I learned the benefit of chunks as opposed to chips. I
wrap two good sized chunks of hickory in foil, punch a couple of small
holes in the foil, and place one over the burner with the flame. The
second one is to replace the first as it usually takes 2 chunks to do ribs.

After about 90 minutes, I turn my ribs from meaty-side up to meaty-side
down. That's usually when I change the chunk. After another 90 minutes I
check for done. If the meat is shrinking back on the bone and the ribs
are a mahogany color, they are done.

I never baste mine. I have found that most basting sauces contain sugar
and the sugar causes the meat to brown too quickly with the outside
getting cooked before the inside. I save basting sauces for things like
pork chops and fish that grill quickly.

Our ribs last night were fantastic. We each had a little puddle of our
favorite sauce for dipping on the side, but we hardly use much because
the rub gives the ribs such great flavor and they are never dry when
cooked slowly over low heat.

I hope you have a wonderful time with your new grill.

--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life


Do you need to turn the ribs meaty-side down?


Probably not, but the foil underneath catches all that lovely
rub-seasoned grease and turning the ribs puts the meaty side in contact
with the good stuff.

--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 07-06-2008, 02:06 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,518
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

Paul the Q noob wrote:

I've been reading up on the chunks of wood - put 1 in tinfoil, poke
some holes in it, put it over the weber's flavorizer bars. some people
change the chunks during the cooking time i imagine.


I find that one chunk doesn't smoke long enough so I wrap two before I
start and change them out midway.

I wonder if I should be putting a drip pan filled with water under the
ribs (on the flavorizer bars under the grill grates) ? i see some
people doing this.


I think that would work well. I use the foil. The whole idea is to keep
the drippings from messing up the grill too much.
--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 08-06-2008, 02:42 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,209
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?


"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
meatnub wrote:

Let's say I want to do a full rack of ribs, I read something about
cutting off the membrane on the back of the ribs. Do you turn the meat
on the grill at all or just let it sit for X number of hours?

Do you need to baste at all?


I did a full rack of ribs on the gas grill yesterday. The trick is to use
indirect heat, so if you have 3 burners, light one and put the meat over
the unlit burners. I put foil under my meat to prevent flare-up from
drippings. That's fine with a steak, but not with slow smoking.

The morning before I want to make the ribs, I rub them and put them in
foil in the fridge for a few hours.

I peel off the membrane, but it's really not a necessity. I don't think it
changes the taste or the eating, I just think its fun to peel it off.

I let my grill come up to 250 degrees F. Even 275 is okay, but I prefer
250.

From this group I learned the benefit of chunks as opposed to chips. I
wrap two good sized chunks of hickory in foil, punch a couple of small
holes in the foil, and place one over the burner with the flame. The
second one is to replace the first as it usually takes 2 chunks to do
ribs.

After about 90 minutes, I turn my ribs from meaty-side up to meaty-side
down. That's usually when I change the chunk. After another 90 minutes I
check for done. If the meat is shrinking back on the bone and the ribs are
a mahogany color, they are done.

I never baste mine. I have found that most basting sauces contain sugar
and the sugar causes the meat to brown too quickly with the outside
getting cooked before the inside. I save basting sauces for things like
pork chops and fish that grill quickly.

Our ribs last night were fantastic. We each had a little puddle of our
favorite sauce for dipping on the side, but we hardly use much because the
rub gives the ribs such great flavor and they are never dry when cooked
slowly over low heat.

I hope you have a wonderful time with your new grill.


Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life


Thanks for what sounds like a great rib routine. I would never have put the
rack on foil on the grate when you start. It a great idea. On the Weber Gas,
do you light the front burner or the back burner? Do you put your foil
covered wood on the burner, or on the flavorizer bars? Do you rotate 180
degrees for even heat? Do you use a grate thermometer to make sure your temp
is 250F, or rely on the dome thermometer? In phase two, meat side down, do
you ever wrap the entire rack with foil to maintain moisture?

Again, thanks,

Kent


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 08-06-2008, 04:55 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,518
Default Low & Slow on my Weber gas grill?

Kent wrote:
"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
meatnub wrote:

Let's say I want to do a full rack of ribs, I read something about
cutting off the membrane on the back of the ribs. Do you turn the meat
on the grill at all or just let it sit for X number of hours?

Do you need to baste at all?

I did a full rack of ribs on the gas grill yesterday. The trick is to use
indirect heat, so if you have 3 burners, light one and put the meat over
the unlit burners. I put foil under my meat to prevent flare-up from
drippings. That's fine with a steak, but not with slow smoking.

The morning before I want to make the ribs, I rub them and put them in
foil in the fridge for a few hours.

I peel off the membrane, but it's really not a necessity. I don't think it
changes the taste or the eating, I just think its fun to peel it off.

I let my grill come up to 250 degrees F. Even 275 is okay, but I prefer
250.

From this group I learned the benefit of chunks as opposed to chips. I
wrap two good sized chunks of hickory in foil, punch a couple of small
holes in the foil, and place one over the burner with the flame. The
second one is to replace the first as it usually takes 2 chunks to do
ribs.

After about 90 minutes, I turn my ribs from meaty-side up to meaty-side
down. That's usually when I change the chunk. After another 90 minutes I
check for done. If the meat is shrinking back on the bone and the ribs are
a mahogany color, they are done.

I never baste mine. I have found that most basting sauces contain sugar
and the sugar causes the meat to brown too quickly with the outside
getting cooked before the inside. I save basting sauces for things like
pork chops and fish that grill quickly.

Our ribs last night were fantastic. We each had a little puddle of our
favorite sauce for dipping on the side, but we hardly use much because the
rub gives the ribs such great flavor and they are never dry when cooked
slowly over low heat.

I hope you have a wonderful time with your new grill.


Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life


Thanks for what sounds like a great rib routine. I would never have put the
rack on foil on the grate when you start. It a great idea. On the Weber Gas,
do you light the front burner or the back burner? Do you put your foil
covered wood on the burner, or on the flavorizer bars? Do you rotate 180
degrees for even heat? Do you use a grate thermometer to make sure your temp
is 250F, or rely on the dome thermometer? In phase two, meat side down, do
you ever wrap the entire rack with foil to maintain moisture?


I don't have a Weber and I don't know what "flavorizer bars" are but I
put the foil packet with the wood chunk on the grate, over the flame.

I have a thermometer on the cover of the grill (dome thermometer) and
that's the one I use to gage the temperature.

I do not wrap the entire rack with the foil. It gets moisture from the
meat side lying in the drippings caught in the foil as well as from the
fat distributed in the meat.

Good luck and good eating.

Again, thanks,

Kent




--
Janet Wilder
Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
Good Friends. Good Life
 




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