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Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

CONVERT RECIPE MEASUREMENTS : ENGLISH-METRIC, METRIC-ENGLISH



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 07-12-2005, 09:07 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default CONVERT RECIPE MEASUREMENTS : ENGLISH-METRIC, METRIC-ENGLISH

Recipe-Convert-Table Tip :

Very usefull when reading recipes,
with measurements you are not familiar with (metric versus english)

The recipe measurement conversions below are estimates,
but the difference to being exact measurements
can be neglected when cooking your recipe.

-For exact recipe-measurement-conversions :
http://www.theskinnycook.com/convert-measurements.html
-

LENGTH MEASUREMENTS

3mm = 1/8 inch
6mm = 1/4 inch
1,5 cm = 1/2 inch
2cm = 3/4 inch
2,5cm = 1 inch
5cm = 2 inch
30cm = 12 inch = 1 foot

WEIGTH MEASUREMENTS

15g = 1/2 oz
30g = 1 oz
60g = 2 oz
90g = 3 oz
125g = 4 oz = 1/4lb
155g = 5 oz
185g = 6 oz
220g = 7 oz
250g = 8oz = 1/2lb
500g = 16 oz = 1lb
750g = 24 oz = 1 + 1/2lb
1000g = 32oz = 2lb
1kg = 32oz = 2lb

LIQUID MEASUREMENTS

1 teaspoon = 5 ml
30ml = 1 fluid oz
60ml = 2 fluid oz
100ml = 3 fluid oz
125ml = 4 fluid oz
150ml = 5 fluid oz = 1/4 pint
190ml = 6 fluid oz
250ml = 8 fluid oz
300ml = 10 fluid oz = 1/2 pint
500ml = 16 fluid oz
600ml = 20 fluid oz = 1 pint
1000ml = 32 fluid oz = 1 + 3/4 pints
1 litre = 32 fluid oz = 1 + 3/4 pints


OVEN TEMPERATURES
Fahrenheit Celsius Gas-mark Power
250 120 1 Very Slow
300 150 2 Slow
325 160 3 Moderate slow
350-375 180-190 4 Moderate
400-425 200-210 5 Moderate hot
450-475 220-230 6 Hot
500-525 240-250 7 Very hot

US, UK, AUSTRALIa and NEW-ZEALAND
To add to the recipes-measurement conversions please note :
* tablespoon
* 1 tablespoon = 15 ml in US, UK and NZ
* 1 tablespoon = 20 ml in Australia
* 1 cup = 250 ml

EGGS
Eggs used in recipes are the ones you buy in the shop :
the are about 60 grams or 2 oz and are called "normal size"

If you rare your own chicken like the Skinny Cook,
be aware that a skinny egg can weigh less than 40 grams or just about 1
oz,
so adjust your recipes accordingly!

If you feel that still some extra information can be added here,
please email your comments at

Enjoy your cooking!
---------------------------------------------------------
http://recipe.theskinnycook.com
Recipes : Recipe network, home-cooked recipes, cooking tips
----------------------------------------------------------

Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2005, 04:29 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default CONVERT RECIPE MEASUREMENTS : ENGLISH-METRIC, METRIC-ENGLISH

The differences won't matter if you stick one unit and stay with it. If
you use Metric for the first measurement, use it all the way through the
recipe and you will be OK. You will only get into trouble if you use
both units in the same recipe.

H.

In article .com,
wrote:

Recipe-Convert-Table Tip :

Very usefull when reading recipes,
with measurements you are not familiar with (metric versus english)

The recipe measurement conversions below are estimates,
but the difference to being exact measurements
can be neglected when cooking your recipe.

-For exact recipe-measurement-conversions :
http://www.theskinnycook.com/convert-measurements.html
-

LENGTH MEASUREMENTS

3mm = 1/8 inch
6mm = 1/4 inch
1,5 cm = 1/2 inch
2cm = 3/4 inch
2,5cm = 1 inch
5cm = 2 inch
30cm = 12 inch = 1 foot

WEIGTH MEASUREMENTS

15g = 1/2 oz
30g = 1 oz
60g = 2 oz
90g = 3 oz
125g = 4 oz = 1/4lb
155g = 5 oz
185g = 6 oz
220g = 7 oz
250g = 8oz = 1/2lb
500g = 16 oz = 1lb
750g = 24 oz = 1 + 1/2lb
1000g = 32oz = 2lb
1kg = 32oz = 2lb

LIQUID MEASUREMENTS

1 teaspoon = 5 ml
30ml = 1 fluid oz
60ml = 2 fluid oz
100ml = 3 fluid oz
125ml = 4 fluid oz
150ml = 5 fluid oz = 1/4 pint
190ml = 6 fluid oz
250ml = 8 fluid oz
300ml = 10 fluid oz = 1/2 pint
500ml = 16 fluid oz
600ml = 20 fluid oz = 1 pint
1000ml = 32 fluid oz = 1 + 3/4 pints
1 litre = 32 fluid oz = 1 + 3/4 pints


OVEN TEMPERATURES
Fahrenheit Celsius Gas-mark Power
250 120 1 Very Slow
300 150 2 Slow
325 160 3 Moderate slow
350-375 180-190 4 Moderate
400-425 200-210 5 Moderate hot
450-475 220-230 6 Hot
500-525 240-250 7 Very hot

US, UK, AUSTRALIa and NEW-ZEALAND
To add to the recipes-measurement conversions please note :
* tablespoon
* 1 tablespoon = 15 ml in US, UK and NZ
* 1 tablespoon = 20 ml in Australia
* 1 cup = 250 ml

EGGS
Eggs used in recipes are the ones you buy in the shop :
the are about 60 grams or 2 oz and are called "normal size"

If you rare your own chicken like the Skinny Cook,
be aware that a skinny egg can weigh less than 40 grams or just about 1
oz,
so adjust your recipes accordingly!

If you feel that still some extra information can be added here,
please email your comments at

Enjoy your cooking!
---------------------------------------------------------
http://recipe.theskinnycook.com
Recipes : Recipe network, home-cooked recipes, cooking tips
----------------------------------------------------------

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 09-12-2005, 12:11 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default CONVERT RECIPE MEASUREMENTS : ENGLISH-METRIC, METRIC-ENGLISH

"Rowbotth" wrote in message
...

The differences won't matter if you stick one unit
and stay with it. If you use Metric for the first
measurement, use it all the way through the recipe
and you will be OK. You will only get into trouble
if you use both units in the same recipe.


I don't think that's the point of the post. For instance, I have cookbooks
from all over the world; some are in metric, the majority are not. It's
useful to know that a US pint is different from a UK pint (16 versus 20
ounces), or that a Japanese "cup" (as used in Nobu Matsushita's book -- and
at least he mentions the difference!) is closer to six ounces than eight.
My Danish husband's mother was a cook and I have a number of her cookbooks
and handwritten recipes, all written pre-metric conversion. I need to know
that Danish pounds are not the same as US pounds and that Danish teaspoon,
children's spoon and tablespoon are different than US teaspoon and
tablespoon measurements. My Voss oven is calibrated in Celsius, rather than
Fahrenheit; I darn well better be able to find or do the conversion before I
put a cake in the oven!

I think you get the point. I agree that keeping to one measuring system
within a recipe is a good thing. Conversion is, however, sometimes a
necessary thing.

Now if someone could tell me if the 15ml versus 20ml per tablespoon is the
only difference between US and pre-metric Australian measurements, I'd be
thrilled.

-j


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2005, 07:17 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default CONVERT RECIPE MEASUREMENTS : ENGLISH-METRIC, METRIC-ENGLISH

On Fri, 9 Dec 2005 12:11:21 +0100, "jacqui{JB}"
wrote:

Now if someone could tell me if the 15ml versus 20ml per tablespoon is the
only difference between US and pre-metric Australian measurements, I'd be
thrilled.


The 4 teaspoon tablespoon of Australia was different, but it was NOT the
only difference...

The Australian gallon was the same as the Imperial Gallon, and not the
US gallon, which is much smaller. The Aussie pint was the imperial pint
and not the same as the US pint. The 10 ounces of the imperial pint are
each smaller than the US ounce, so that the 10 ounces are not 10/8 a US
pint, incidentally. 1 UK gallon is 1.20095 US gallon, and an imperial
gallon is equal to 9.6076 US pints, but only 8 imperial pints. An
imperial pint is not 1.25 times a US pint but rather is also 1.20095
times a US pint... and so it goes.

FWIW

RsH
================================================== =====
Copyright retained. My opinions - no one else's...
If this is illegal where you are, do not read it!
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2005, 07:20 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default CONVERT RECIPE MEASUREMENTS : ENGLISH-METRIC, METRIC-ENGLISH

In article ,
retzofrex wrote:

On Fri, 9 Dec 2005 12:11:21 +0100, "jacqui{JB}"
wrote:

Now if someone could tell me if the 15ml versus 20ml per tablespoon is the
only difference between US and pre-metric Australian measurements, I'd be
thrilled.


The 4 teaspoon tablespoon of Australia was different, but it was NOT the
only difference...

The Australian gallon was the same as the Imperial Gallon, and not the
US gallon, which is much smaller. The Aussie pint was the imperial pint
and not the same as the US pint. The 10 ounces of the imperial pint are
each smaller than the US ounce, so that the 10 ounces are not 10/8 a US
pint, incidentally. 1 UK gallon is 1.20095 US gallon, and an imperial
gallon is equal to 9.6076 US pints, but only 8 imperial pints. An
imperial pint is not 1.25 times a US pint but rather is also 1.20095
times a US pint... and so it goes.

FWIW

RsH
================================================== =====
Copyright retained. My opinions - no one else's...
If this is illegal where you are, do not read it!


A US Gallon has 128 ounces. An Imperial gallon has 160 ounces.

An ounce is an ounce is an ounce. (See
http://www.alwayslearn.com/conversion/volume.html for my rationale.)

I had never heard of a tablespoon with 4 teaspoons before. Too much
Foster's, maybe?

H.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2005, 10:24 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default CONVERT RECIPE MEASUREMENTS : ENGLISH-METRIC, METRIC-ENGLISH

In article ,
Rowbotth wrote:
= The differences won't matter if you stick one unit and stay with it. If
= you use Metric for the first measurement, use it all the way through the
= recipe and you will be OK. You will only get into trouble if you use
= both units in the same recipe.

I'm not sure I see what you mean by this.

As long as you use the *right* unit, it shouldn't matter whether
they're all one, all the other, of a mix of both.

Are you simply suggesting that you can use the same numbers and
call them either cups or litres, pounds or kilograms, etc?

If so, I'm not convinced that you're right. The proportion
between, e.g., cups and litres is different to that between pounds
and kilograms, etc.

One cup is half a pint which is *approximately* one quarter litre
(250 millilitres). One pound, on the other hand is somewhat less
than half a kilogram.

Consider a recipe (for nothing you'd want to make as an example:

Original:

1 litre water
1 kilogram flour

Replacing litre with cup and kilogram with pound yields:

1 cup water
1 pound flour

The real (approximate) translation would be

1 quart water (i.e. 4 cups)
2.2 pound flour

So, reducing the properly translated recipe to the equivalent
one-cup version, would yield (approximately):

1 cup water
0.55 pound flour

showing that simply substituting US units for metric ones while
using the same numbers yields a version in this example where one
has, relatively, twice as much flour (approximately) as one should
have.

Will there be specific cases where one can get away with that?
Probably. Can one depend on it in every case? Absolutely not.

So I must be misinterpreting what you're saying above.

Can you clarify?


--
Charlie Sorsby

Edgewood, NM 87015
USA
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 14-12-2005, 02:15 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default CONVERT RECIPE MEASUREMENTS : ENGLISH-METRIC, METRIC-ENGLISH

I meant that if you find a recipe with both English and metric units
displayed, you should stick with the same units all through the thing.
Not advised to use metric measurements for the small quantity liquids
and then using English for the flour, sugar, etc, because you have no
metric measuring implements.

?

H.

In article ,
(Charlie Sorsby) wrote:

In article ,
Rowbotth wrote:
= The differences won't matter if you stick one unit and stay with it. If
= you use Metric for the first measurement, use it all the way through the
= recipe and you will be OK. You will only get into trouble if you use
= both units in the same recipe.

I'm not sure I see what you mean by this.

As long as you use the *right* unit, it shouldn't matter whether
they're all one, all the other, of a mix of both.

Are you simply suggesting that you can use the same numbers and
call them either cups or litres, pounds or kilograms, etc?

If so, I'm not convinced that you're right. The proportion
between, e.g., cups and litres is different to that between pounds
and kilograms, etc.

One cup is half a pint which is *approximately* one quarter litre
(250 millilitres). One pound, on the other hand is somewhat less
than half a kilogram.

Consider a recipe (for nothing you'd want to make as an example:

Original:

1 litre water
1 kilogram flour

Replacing litre with cup and kilogram with pound yields:

1 cup water
1 pound flour

The real (approximate) translation would be

1 quart water (i.e. 4 cups)
2.2 pound flour

So, reducing the properly translated recipe to the equivalent
one-cup version, would yield (approximately):

1 cup water
0.55 pound flour

showing that simply substituting US units for metric ones while
using the same numbers yields a version in this example where one
has, relatively, twice as much flour (approximately) as one should
have.

Will there be specific cases where one can get away with that?
Probably. Can one depend on it in every case? Absolutely not.

So I must be misinterpreting what you're saying above.

Can you clarify?

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 16-12-2005, 09:22 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default CONVERT RECIPE MEASUREMENTS : ENGLISH-METRIC, METRIC-ENGLISH

Sorry to disallusion you but Iin Australian recipes, you need to read
very carefully, because their tablespoon IS 4 teaspoons, and not the
three used elsewhere. Now that metrification has occurred, the teaspoon
in Canada, Australian and the UK has been standardised at 5mL while
before metricification there were differences in the size of the
teaspoon as well, so that the teaspoon was also different between the
US, Canada, the UK and Australia. If you are interested in the
historical differences, you will find them on the web via a search. For
example,
1.2 teaspoon (US) = 1 teaspoon (UK)
1.2 Tablespoon (US) = 1 Tablespoon (UK)

See Cookbook:Cuisine of Australia
From Wikibooks, the open-content textbooks collection
Warning: Australia uses a metric tablespoon defined to be 20 mL, while
the rest of the world uses a tablespoon that is approximately 15 mL. An
Australian tablespoon contains 4 teaspoons, not 3. Australian recipes
might use this, and might also use normal-sized tablespoons due to
foreign influence. Be wary.

see http://www.fareshare.net/conversions.html
The Australian tablespoon is 20mL; the British tablespoon is
17.7mL; in most Canadian recipes the tablespoon is 15mL; the American
tablespoon is actually 14.2mL.

For a repeat of the above, go to
http://www.fortune3.com/~comp73799/measurement_converter.pdf#search='australian%20tab lespoon'

For the record:
The US Gill is equal to 0.832674132978059037 of a UK Gill, while
the US Gill = 4 fluid ounces but the UK Gill = 5 fluid ounces. You are
basically correct that the liquid ounce is virtually identical, but it
is NOT IDENTICAL in volume... just very close. See below!. There is a
difference of about 1mL between the two ounce sizes.

British, Australian and sometimes Canadian recipes use the imperial pint
which is 20 fluid ounces; American and sometimes Canadian recipes use
the American pint of 16 fluid ounces. so do NOT assume that when a
recipe says a pint, it is YOUR pint.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversion_of_units#Volume

teaspoon (Canadian) ? 1/6 fl oz (Imp) = 4.735 510 416 667 mL
teaspoon (U.S.) ? 1/6 US fl oz = 4.928 921 595 mL
teaspoon (metric) = 5 mL
teaspoon (Imperial) ? 1/24 gi (Imp) = 5.919 388 020 8(3) mL

dessertspoon (Imperial) ? 1/12 gi (Imp) = 11.838 776 041 mL
tablespoon (Canadian) ? fl oz (Imp) = 14.206 531 25 mL
tablespoon (U.S.) ? US fl oz = 14.786 764 782 5 mL
tablespoon (metric) = 15 mL
tablespoon (Imperial) ? 5/8 fl oz (Imp) = 17.758 164 062 5 mL

fluid ounce (Imperial) fl oz (Imp)
1/160 gal (Imp) = 28.413 062 5 mL
fluid ounce (U.S.) fl oz (US)
1/128 gal (US) = 29.573 529 562 5 mL

RsH


On Sat, 10 Dec 2005 18:20:34 GMT, Rowbotth
wrote:

A US Gallon has 128 ounces. An Imperial gallon has 160 ounces.

An ounce is an ounce is an ounce. (See
http://www.alwayslearn.com/conversion/volume.html for my rationale.)

I had never heard of a tablespoon with 4 teaspoons before. Too much
Foster's, maybe?

H.

================================================== =====
Copyright retained. My opinions - no one else's...
If this is illegal where you are, do not read it!
 




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