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Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Proofing bread at home.



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2004, 03:35 AM
Fred
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Default Proofing bread at home.

I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you do it
at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2004, 03:53 AM
Vox Humana
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Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.


"Fred" wrote in message
. net...
I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you do it
at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?


I don't find that I need a proofer unless I want to speed up the process.
You get better bread with a slow rise in a cool place. You can rig a
proofing box in a number of ways. 1) put a 11x14 pan of hot water in your
oven, place the dough in a bowl, and close the door. 2) bring a 4 cup
measure of water to a boil in your microwave, put the dough in a bowl, place
in the oven, close the door. 3) Put the dough with a pan of hot water on a
tray and invert a large plastic storage bin over it. 4) put a jug of hot
water in a picnic cooler with the dough and cover.

You get the idea. You just need a way to trap warm, moist air. Many newer
ovens have a "proof" setting. That turns the convection oven on at a
temperature of 100F. They usually recommend that you add a pan of boiling
water for moisture.


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2004, 03:54 AM
Mike Avery
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.

On 17 Jan 2004 at 2:35, Fred wrote:

I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had
a chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you
do it at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is
there some good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home
kitchen?


There are lots of ways.... you can cover the bread with oil (a thin film),
saran wrap, or a wet towel and put the bread in a warm place. The big
goals are to keep the bread from drying out, and then keep it warm.

A good place is in an oven with a pilot light or the oven lamp on.
Check your temps though, the oven can get too warm.

Some people use sweater boxes as the seal well. Others use
styrofoam coolers with some hot water in them.... lots of choices
here....

Mike
--
Mike Avery

ICQ: 16241692 AOL IM:MAvery81230
Phone: 970-642-0280
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warned that this process will ultimately lead to the heat death of
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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2004, 04:43 AM
LIMEYNO1
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Default Proofing bread at home.

When I am forming my bread into loaves or rolls, I turn my oven (gas) till
it just comes on. Turn it off and turn the light on. Put my formed dough
in the oven covered by a towel till risen.

--
Helen

Thanks be unto God for His wonderful gift:
Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God
is the object of our faith; the only faith that
saves is faith in Him


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225/190/145





"Fred" wrote in message
. net...
I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you do it
at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com




  #5 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2004, 02:17 PM
Brian Macke
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.

On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 02:35:55 +0000, Fred wrote:

I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you do
it at home?


I proof my dough by putting the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover it
with saran wrap, and put the bowl on top of my computer monitor. The
inside of the bowl ends up being just the right temp.

During the summer, I'll sometimes put the bowl in sunlight to provide more
even heating.

Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there some good way
to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?


I proof my doughnuts at room temperature, and I've seen that it's better
for the dough. Alton Brown claims that you should proof in the fridge, but
I can't say that I agree with that. I've noticed that it leads to uneven
proofing as the dough goes through its temperature change in a rather slow
fashion. Minor point, but for fragile doughs it can be a problem.

Fred



--
-Brian James Macke
"In order to get that which you wish for, you must first get that which
builds it." -- Unknown

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2004, 02:46 PM
Fred
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.


"Fred" wrote in message
. net...
I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you do it
at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com



Thanks for the tips. I was really concerned about proofing after the loaves
are made up. The first proofing isn't much of a deal and room temp. seems
fine to me. The idea of starting and then stopping the oven makes sense.
I'll work with that idea. In fact I'll make up some dinner rolls at the
store today and test the process in our "consumer kitchen." Take care.

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2004, 03:17 PM
Dee Randall
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Fred" wrote in message
. net...
I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you do

it
at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there

some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?


I don't find that I need a proofer unless I want to speed up the process.
You get better bread with a slow rise in a cool place. You can rig a
proofing box in a number of ways. 1) put a 11x14 pan of hot water in your
oven, place the dough in a bowl, and close the door. 2) bring a 4 cup
measure of water to a boil in your microwave, put the dough in a bowl,

place
in the oven, close the door. 3) Put the dough with a pan of hot water on

a
tray and invert a large plastic storage bin over it. 4) put a jug of hot
water in a picnic cooler with the dough and cover.

You get the idea. You just need a way to trap warm, moist air. Many

newer
ovens have a "proof" setting. That turns the convection oven on at a
temperature of 100F. They usually recommend that you add a pan of boiling
water for moisture.


snip
3) Put the dough with a pan of hot water on a
tray and invert a large plastic storage bin over it.

I have a large plastic storage bin to cover my dough to raise. I'm not sure
what you mean by putting the dough with a pan of hot water on a tray .." I
can't visualize this, can you be a little more specific for me?

thanks
Dee


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2004, 03:19 PM
Dee Randall
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.


"LIMEYNO1" wrote in message
...
When I am forming my bread into loaves or rolls, I turn my oven (gas) till
it just comes on. Turn it off and turn the light on. Put my formed dough
in the oven covered by a towel till risen.

--
Helen


Helen, do you have two ovens? I usually put my stone in to heat up 45
minutes before baking. Do you use this procedure on your second rise as
well?

Thanks,
Dee




"Fred" wrote in message
. net...
I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you do

it
at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there

some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com






  #9 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2004, 07:57 PM
paula
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.

pc playing up so sorry if this appears more than once.i empty a shelf
in my airing cupboard and pop the bowl of dough in there for the first
rise.(if my kitchen is not warm enough--otherwise i just leave it on
the worktop) for the second rise i put the bread tins on top of my
central heating boiler and the warmth from that is just right.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2004, 11:04 PM
Karen
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.


"Fred" wrote in message
. net...
I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you do it
at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com



Here's my setup for proofing yeast dough: I place the oiled dough in a
warmed greased bowl, then place the covered bowl on top of an electric
heating pad (yeah, the kind used for sore muscles! LOL) set at "medium".
When I make rolls, after the first rising I shape the rolls, place them on a
greased baking sheet, cover, and place the baking sheet on the heating pad
for the final rise.

In lieu of a heating pad, I've used a 9"x13" roasting pan filled halfway
with the hottest water from the tap. I set the baking sheet on top of that
and cover the dough. This works really well, too.

When kitchen and oven space are at a premium, these "portable" methods can
be used in almost any room in the house...as long as you remember you've got
dough rising somewhere! :-)

Karen


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 18-01-2004, 01:48 AM
Fred
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.


"Fred" wrote in message
. net...

"Fred" wrote in message
. net...
I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you do

it
at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there

some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com



Thanks for the tips. I was really concerned about proofing after the

loaves
are made up. The first proofing isn't much of a deal and room temp. seems
fine to me. The idea of starting and then stopping the oven makes sense.
I'll work with that idea. In fact I'll make up some dinner rolls at the
store today and test the process in our "consumer kitchen." Take care.

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com



I tried the oven method today. I turned the oven on for about a minute and
then shut it off and put a pan of dinner rolls and a pan of baguettes in to
proof. The proofed product was pretty uneven. What I mean is that the
baguettes had a lumpy crust as though some little creature was inside trying
to break through in spots and the cloverleaf rolls looked kind of funny.
Nevertheless, everything baked to perfection and the product had perfect
texture and good flavor. I think the oven might have proofed a little too
fast and, hence, unevenly. At least the dough was good. I'll keep
experimenting.

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 18-01-2004, 03:30 AM
Kenneth
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.

On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 00:48:45 GMT, "Fred"
wrote:


"Fred" wrote in message
.net...

"Fred" wrote in message
. net...
I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you do

it
at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there

some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com



Thanks for the tips. I was really concerned about proofing after the

loaves
are made up. The first proofing isn't much of a deal and room temp. seems
fine to me. The idea of starting and then stopping the oven makes sense.
I'll work with that idea. In fact I'll make up some dinner rolls at the
store today and test the process in our "consumer kitchen." Take care.

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com



I tried the oven method today. I turned the oven on for about a minute and
then shut it off and put a pan of dinner rolls and a pan of baguettes in to
proof. The proofed product was pretty uneven. What I mean is that the
baguettes had a lumpy crust as though some little creature was inside trying
to break through in spots and the cloverleaf rolls looked kind of funny.
Nevertheless, everything baked to perfection and the product had perfect
texture and good flavor. I think the oven might have proofed a little too
fast and, hence, unevenly. At least the dough was good. I'll keep
experimenting.

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com


Howdy,

It seems that much of this thread is based upon the (false) assumption
that it is best to warm the dough, and therefor accelerate the
proofing process. Generally, cooler, slower proofing yields better
flavor and texture.

All the best,

--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 18-01-2004, 03:38 AM
Mike Avery
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.

On 17 Jan 2004 at 21:30, Kenneth wrote:

It seems that much of this thread is based upon the (false) assumption
that it is best to warm the dough, and therefor accelerate the
proofing process. Generally, cooler, slower proofing yields better
flavor and texture.


While that's true, it's often helpful to have a good idea when the bread will be
done, and how well it will have risen.

Controlling the temperature of the dough as well as the temperature and
humidity of the proofing area are big factors in this.


Mike--
Mike Avery

ICQ: 16241692 AOL IM:MAvery81230
Phone: 970-642-0280
* Spam is for lusers who can't get business any other
way *

Once seen on road signs all over the United States:
Takes the 'H' out of shave
Burma-Shave



  #14 (permalink)  
Old 18-01-2004, 04:46 AM
Dee Randall
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.


"Dee Randall" deedoveyatshenteldotnet wrote in message
...

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Fred" wrote in message
. net...
I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today. I had

a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer. How do you

do
it
at home? Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there

some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?


I don't find that I need a proofer unless I want to speed up the

process.
You get better bread with a slow rise in a cool place. You can rig a
proofing box in a number of ways. 1) put a 11x14 pan of hot water in

your
oven, place the dough in a bowl, and close the door. 2) bring a 4 cup
measure of water to a boil in your microwave, put the dough in a bowl,

place
in the oven, close the door. 3) Put the dough with a pan of hot water

on
a
tray and invert a large plastic storage bin over it. 4) put a jug of

hot
water in a picnic cooler with the dough and cover.

You get the idea. You just need a way to trap warm, moist air. Many

newer
ovens have a "proof" setting. That turns the convection oven on at a
temperature of 100F. They usually recommend that you add a pan of

boiling
water for moisture.


snip
3) Put the dough with a pan of hot water on a
tray and invert a large plastic storage bin over it.

I have a large plastic storage bin to cover my dough to raise. I'm not

sure
what you mean by putting the dough with a pan of hot water on a tray .." I
can't visualize this, can you be a little more specific for me?

thanks
Dee


OK, by jove, I think I've got it. I knew there was a solution there for me
as I have a large plastic bread cover-er.
1) Onto a baking tray, set your container of dough; and beside it on the
tray, set your container of hot water.
2) Cover the tray with a plastic-bread-cover which covers the whole tray
and sits flush on the table so the heat/moisture will not escape.

Thanks,
Dee





  #15 (permalink)  
Old 18-01-2004, 05:00 AM
Brian Macke
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Proofing bread at home.

On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 21:30:34 -0500, Kenneth wrote:

It seems that much of this thread is based upon the (false) assumption
that it is best to warm the dough, and therefor accelerate the proofing
process. Generally, cooler, slower proofing yields better flavor and
texture.


I think it's improper to say that warming up the dough is "accelerating"
the proofing process. Proofing dough is done at the ideal temperature for
yeast growth (near 32C/90F and 80-85% humidity). To raise your dough at
any temperature outside the ideal yeast growth range and you are
"retarding" the yeast growth. Sometimes this is useful, like in doughnut
production. For something like pizza crust, it's just a slower process.
Better to get the pizza dough's yeast moving rather than take 25% longer
for no palatable benefit.


--
-Brian James Macke
"In order to get that which you wish for, you must first get that which
builds it." -- Unknown

 




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