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Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Freezing an apple crisp



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 02:37 AM
Peter Werner
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Freezing an apple crisp

I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter, sugar,
flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded by
the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze several
of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem with baking
them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a microwave to
thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked or unbaked and
bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 02:50 AM
Wayne
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

(Peter Werner) wrote in
m:

I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter, sugar,
flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded by
the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze several
of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem with baking
them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a microwave to
thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked or unbaked and
bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from frozen
state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 02:50 AM
Wayne
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

(Peter Werner) wrote in
m:

I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter, sugar,
flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded by
the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze several
of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem with baking
them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a microwave to
thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked or unbaked and
bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from frozen
state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 07:08 PM
Peggy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Wayne" wrote in message
...
(Peter Werner) wrote in
m:

I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter, sugar,
flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded by
the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze several
of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem with baking
them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a microwave to
thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked or unbaked and
bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from frozen
state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


Have you ever frozen a fresh apple? When thawed, it turns to mush.
'course, I've never baked one from the frozen state.
I'd say bake a crisp and test-freeze one piece to see how well it thaws.
jmho,
Peggy


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 07:08 PM
Peggy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Wayne" wrote in message
...
(Peter Werner) wrote in
m:

I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter, sugar,
flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded by
the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze several
of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem with baking
them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a microwave to
thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked or unbaked and
bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from frozen
state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


Have you ever frozen a fresh apple? When thawed, it turns to mush.
'course, I've never baked one from the frozen state.
I'd say bake a crisp and test-freeze one piece to see how well it thaws.
jmho,
Peggy


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 08:24 PM
Peggy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Wayne" wrote in message
...
"Peggy" wrote in
:

"Wayne" wrote in message
...
(Peter Werner) wrote in
m:

I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter,
sugar, flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded
by the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze
several of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem
with baking them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a
microwave to thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked
or unbaked and bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from frozen
state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


Have you ever frozen a fresh apple? When thawed, it turns to mush.
'course, I've never baked one from the frozen state.
I'd say bake a crisp and test-freeze one piece to see how well it
thaws. jmho,
Peggy


Freezing an apple and thawing it is entirely different than freezing a
prepared pie to be baked from the frozen state. When I can get good
Fall apples, I assemble 10-12 apple pies (exactly the same as if I were
going to bake them immediately) and freeze, then wrap tightly in several
layers of plastic wrap. They go directly from the freezer to the oven
and bake at 375°F for around 90 minutes or until done. They taste like
freshly-made, freshly-baked pies.

I've never tried this with a crisp, since I don't make those, but I
imagine the results would be similar.

I don't know if the OP was posting from the UK or the US, but in the US
there are all kinds of commercially frozen fruit pies that are
oven-ready. They're prepared the same way I prepare mine, but mine are
better.

Today I'm baking a blackberry pie that was prepared the same way earlier
in the summer.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


You're right. I forgot about prepared pies you can purchase (or make, as in
your case) already frozen and just pop in the oven.
And I just realized that a crisp is nothing more than a crustless French
Apple Pie.
~Peggy


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 08:25 PM
Margaret Suran
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Wayne wrote:
"Peggy" wrote in
:


"Wayne" wrote in message
...

(Peter Werner) wrote in
.com:


I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter,
sugar, flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded
by the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze
several of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem
with baking them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a
microwave to thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked
or unbaked and bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from frozen
state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


Have you ever frozen a fresh apple? When thawed, it turns to mush.
'course, I've never baked one from the frozen state.
I'd say bake a crisp and test-freeze one piece to see how well it
thaws. jmho,
Peggy



Freezing an apple and thawing it is entirely different than freezing a
prepared pie to be baked from the frozen state. When I can get good
Fall apples, I assemble 10-12 apple pies (exactly the same as if I were
going to bake them immediately) and freeze, then wrap tightly in several
layers of plastic wrap. They go directly from the freezer to the oven
and bake at 375°F for around 90 minutes or until done. They taste like
freshly-made, freshly-baked pies.

I've never tried this with a crisp, since I don't make those, but I
imagine the results would be similar.

I don't know if the OP was posting from the UK or the US, but in the US
there are all kinds of commercially frozen fruit pies that are
oven-ready. They're prepared the same way I prepare mine, but mine are
better.

Today I'm baking a blackberry pie that was prepared the same way earlier
in the summer.


I do not know about apple crisps, but I have frozen baked peach
crisps. They freeze well and after thawing them, I put them into a hot
oven for several minutes, to get the crispness back into the streusel
topping. They taste just as if they were freshly baked.

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 08:25 PM
Margaret Suran
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Wayne wrote:
"Peggy" wrote in
:


"Wayne" wrote in message
...

(Peter Werner) wrote in
.com:


I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter,
sugar, flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded
by the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze
several of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem
with baking them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a
microwave to thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked
or unbaked and bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from frozen
state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


Have you ever frozen a fresh apple? When thawed, it turns to mush.
'course, I've never baked one from the frozen state.
I'd say bake a crisp and test-freeze one piece to see how well it
thaws. jmho,
Peggy



Freezing an apple and thawing it is entirely different than freezing a
prepared pie to be baked from the frozen state. When I can get good
Fall apples, I assemble 10-12 apple pies (exactly the same as if I were
going to bake them immediately) and freeze, then wrap tightly in several
layers of plastic wrap. They go directly from the freezer to the oven
and bake at 375°F for around 90 minutes or until done. They taste like
freshly-made, freshly-baked pies.

I've never tried this with a crisp, since I don't make those, but I
imagine the results would be similar.

I don't know if the OP was posting from the UK or the US, but in the US
there are all kinds of commercially frozen fruit pies that are
oven-ready. They're prepared the same way I prepare mine, but mine are
better.

Today I'm baking a blackberry pie that was prepared the same way earlier
in the summer.


I do not know about apple crisps, but I have frozen baked peach
crisps. They freeze well and after thawing them, I put them into a hot
oven for several minutes, to get the crispness back into the streusel
topping. They taste just as if they were freshly baked.

  #9 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 08:52 PM
Wayne
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Peggy" wrote in
:

"Wayne" wrote in message
...
"Peggy" wrote in
:

"Wayne" wrote in message
...
(Peter Werner) wrote in
m:

I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps
- baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter,
sugar, flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice
exuded by the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze
several of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem
with baking them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using
a microwave to thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially
baked or unbaked and bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from
frozen state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.

Have you ever frozen a fresh apple? When thawed, it turns to mush.
'course, I've never baked one from the frozen state.
I'd say bake a crisp and test-freeze one piece to see how well it
thaws. jmho,
Peggy


Freezing an apple and thawing it is entirely different than freezing
a prepared pie to be baked from the frozen state. When I can get
good Fall apples, I assemble 10-12 apple pies (exactly the same as if
I were going to bake them immediately) and freeze, then wrap tightly
in several layers of plastic wrap. They go directly from the freezer
to the oven and bake at 375°F for around 90 minutes or until done.
They taste like freshly-made, freshly-baked pies.

I've never tried this with a crisp, since I don't make those, but I
imagine the results would be similar.

I don't know if the OP was posting from the UK or the US, but in the
US there are all kinds of commercially frozen fruit pies that are
oven-ready. They're prepared the same way I prepare mine, but mine
are better.

Today I'm baking a blackberry pie that was prepared the same way
earlier in the summer.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


You're right. I forgot about prepared pies you can purchase (or make,
as in your case) already frozen and just pop in the oven.
And I just realized that a crisp is nothing more than a crustless
French Apple Pie.
~Peggy


Peggy, the reason I do them unbaked is that reheating or rebaking a pie
that was first baked and then frozen just doesn't taste as fresh. Guess
I'm going to have to try a crisp! g

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 08:52 PM
Wayne
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Peggy" wrote in
:

"Wayne" wrote in message
...
"Peggy" wrote in
:

"Wayne" wrote in message
...
(Peter Werner) wrote in
m:

I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps
- baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter,
sugar, flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice
exuded by the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze
several of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem
with baking them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using
a microwave to thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially
baked or unbaked and bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from
frozen state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.

Have you ever frozen a fresh apple? When thawed, it turns to mush.
'course, I've never baked one from the frozen state.
I'd say bake a crisp and test-freeze one piece to see how well it
thaws. jmho,
Peggy


Freezing an apple and thawing it is entirely different than freezing
a prepared pie to be baked from the frozen state. When I can get
good Fall apples, I assemble 10-12 apple pies (exactly the same as if
I were going to bake them immediately) and freeze, then wrap tightly
in several layers of plastic wrap. They go directly from the freezer
to the oven and bake at 375°F for around 90 minutes or until done.
They taste like freshly-made, freshly-baked pies.

I've never tried this with a crisp, since I don't make those, but I
imagine the results would be similar.

I don't know if the OP was posting from the UK or the US, but in the
US there are all kinds of commercially frozen fruit pies that are
oven-ready. They're prepared the same way I prepare mine, but mine
are better.

Today I'm baking a blackberry pie that was prepared the same way
earlier in the summer.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


You're right. I forgot about prepared pies you can purchase (or make,
as in your case) already frozen and just pop in the oven.
And I just realized that a crisp is nothing more than a crustless
French Apple Pie.
~Peggy


Peggy, the reason I do them unbaked is that reheating or rebaking a pie
that was first baked and then frozen just doesn't taste as fresh. Guess
I'm going to have to try a crisp! g

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 16-08-2004, 02:10 AM
lindacurley63
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I work in a grocery store bakery, and our pies come in unbaked and frozen,
and they are wonderful! Taste a lot like homemade! I would also suggest
freezing them unbaked!
"Margaret Suran" wrote in message
...


Wayne wrote:
"Peggy" wrote in
:


"Wayne" wrote in message
...

(Peter Werner) wrote in
.com:


I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter,
sugar, flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded
by the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze
several of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem
with baking them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a
microwave to thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked
or unbaked and bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from frozen
state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.

Have you ever frozen a fresh apple? When thawed, it turns to mush.
'course, I've never baked one from the frozen state.
I'd say bake a crisp and test-freeze one piece to see how well it
thaws. jmho,
Peggy



Freezing an apple and thawing it is entirely different than freezing a
prepared pie to be baked from the frozen state. When I can get good
Fall apples, I assemble 10-12 apple pies (exactly the same as if I were
going to bake them immediately) and freeze, then wrap tightly in several
layers of plastic wrap. They go directly from the freezer to the oven
and bake at 375°F for around 90 minutes or until done. They taste like
freshly-made, freshly-baked pies.

I've never tried this with a crisp, since I don't make those, but I
imagine the results would be similar.

I don't know if the OP was posting from the UK or the US, but in the US
there are all kinds of commercially frozen fruit pies that are
oven-ready. They're prepared the same way I prepare mine, but mine are
better.

Today I'm baking a blackberry pie that was prepared the same way earlier
in the summer.


I do not know about apple crisps, but I have frozen baked peach
crisps. They freeze well and after thawing them, I put them into a hot
oven for several minutes, to get the crispness back into the streusel
topping. They taste just as if they were freshly baked.



  #12 (permalink)  
Old 16-08-2004, 02:10 AM
lindacurley63
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I work in a grocery store bakery, and our pies come in unbaked and frozen,
and they are wonderful! Taste a lot like homemade! I would also suggest
freezing them unbaked!
"Margaret Suran" wrote in message
...


Wayne wrote:
"Peggy" wrote in
:


"Wayne" wrote in message
...

(Peter Werner) wrote in
.com:


I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter,
sugar, flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded
by the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze
several of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem
with baking them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a
microwave to thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked
or unbaked and bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from frozen
state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.

Have you ever frozen a fresh apple? When thawed, it turns to mush.
'course, I've never baked one from the frozen state.
I'd say bake a crisp and test-freeze one piece to see how well it
thaws. jmho,
Peggy



Freezing an apple and thawing it is entirely different than freezing a
prepared pie to be baked from the frozen state. When I can get good
Fall apples, I assemble 10-12 apple pies (exactly the same as if I were
going to bake them immediately) and freeze, then wrap tightly in several
layers of plastic wrap. They go directly from the freezer to the oven
and bake at 375°F for around 90 minutes or until done. They taste like
freshly-made, freshly-baked pies.

I've never tried this with a crisp, since I don't make those, but I
imagine the results would be similar.

I don't know if the OP was posting from the UK or the US, but in the US
there are all kinds of commercially frozen fruit pies that are
oven-ready. They're prepared the same way I prepare mine, but mine are
better.

Today I'm baking a blackberry pie that was prepared the same way earlier
in the summer.


I do not know about apple crisps, but I have frozen baked peach
crisps. They freeze well and after thawing them, I put them into a hot
oven for several minutes, to get the crispness back into the streusel
topping. They taste just as if they were freshly baked.



  #13 (permalink)  
Old 16-08-2004, 02:10 AM
lindacurley63
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I work in a grocery store bakery, and our pies come in unbaked and frozen,
and they are wonderful! Taste a lot like homemade! I would also suggest
freezing them unbaked!
"Margaret Suran" wrote in message
...


Wayne wrote:
"Peggy" wrote in
:


"Wayne" wrote in message
...

(Peter Werner) wrote in
.com:


I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter,
sugar, flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded
by the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze
several of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem
with baking them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a
microwave to thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked
or unbaked and bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter


Unbaked, then add as much as 50% baking time when baking from frozen
state. They'll taste like fresh-made.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.

Have you ever frozen a fresh apple? When thawed, it turns to mush.
'course, I've never baked one from the frozen state.
I'd say bake a crisp and test-freeze one piece to see how well it
thaws. jmho,
Peggy



Freezing an apple and thawing it is entirely different than freezing a
prepared pie to be baked from the frozen state. When I can get good
Fall apples, I assemble 10-12 apple pies (exactly the same as if I were
going to bake them immediately) and freeze, then wrap tightly in several
layers of plastic wrap. They go directly from the freezer to the oven
and bake at 375°F for around 90 minutes or until done. They taste like
freshly-made, freshly-baked pies.

I've never tried this with a crisp, since I don't make those, but I
imagine the results would be similar.

I don't know if the OP was posting from the UK or the US, but in the US
there are all kinds of commercially frozen fruit pies that are
oven-ready. They're prepared the same way I prepare mine, but mine are
better.

Today I'm baking a blackberry pie that was prepared the same way earlier
in the summer.


I do not know about apple crisps, but I have frozen baked peach
crisps. They freeze well and after thawing them, I put them into a hot
oven for several minutes, to get the crispness back into the streusel
topping. They taste just as if they were freshly baked.



  #14 (permalink)  
Old 18-08-2004, 10:26 PM
Nexis
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Peter Werner" wrote in message
m...
I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter, sugar,
flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded by
the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze several
of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem with baking
them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a microwave to
thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked or unbaked and
bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter



If you freeze them baked, then microwave them they may have decent flavor,
but the crisp portion will be soggy goo. It's better to prepare them, just
as if you were going to bake them, then freeze. When you're ready to enjoy,
just take it directly from freezer to oven (don't thaw first) and increase
your baking time accordingly. Check on it when it's been about time and 1/2
as usual, and go from there. After the first time you'll know just how long
to bake it.
Here's my two favorite crisp recipes for your consideration ;-)

For A Crowd Apple Crisp
This is a good size recipe, baked in a 9x13x2" pan.
Ingredients
10 cups thinly sliced apples
1/4 to 1 cup white sugar (Depends greatly on variety of apple and desired
level of sweetness)
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground nutmeg
1/2 cup water spiked with 2 tsp lemon juice
Topping:
2 cup quick-cooking oats
2 cup all-purpose flour
2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 tsp good cinnamon (I like Penzey's Vietnamese Cinnamon for this)
1 cup butter, melted

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degree C).
2. Place the sliced apples in a 9x13 inch pan. Combine sugar, 1 tablespoon
flour and ground cinnamon and nutmeg together, and sprinkle over
apples.Toss lightly. Pour lemon water evenly over the apples.
3. Combine the oats, flour, brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda,
cinnamon and melted butter together. Should be crumbly, but not too dry or
too wet. Crumble evenly over the apple mixture.
4. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for about 45 minutes. It's done
when the topping is a deep golden color and the apples are fork tender.
5. Serve with cinnamon ice cream, vanilla ice cream, or just whipped cream.
NOTE: A very nice addition to this is to add some slivered or chopped
almonds, about 1/2 cup, to the crisp topping before putting atop the apples.
You can also add 1/2 tsp almond extract to filling.

Julian Mountain Berry Apple Pie
I adapt this recipe to make a crisp at times, though I do like it with the
pastry crust as well. Make it in a deep dish pie pan.

2 1/2 pounds apples, peeled, cored, sliced (Macintosh or Idared are really
good in
this recipe)
2 cups berries: blackberries, raspberries, boysenberries and strawberries in
any combo
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
2 tablespoons flour
1 tablespoon butter
Topping:
1 1/4 cups flour
1/2 c toasted oats
1 1/2 cups brown sugar
1 cup chopped almonds (may use pecans)
3/4 cup cold butter

Directions:
1. Heat oven to 375 degrees F
2. Toss together the apples, 2 tbsp flour, cinnamon, sugar, and nutmeg.
Carefully add in berries.
3. Butter your deep sided pie dish and add the filling to it.
4. Cut cold butter into remaining topping ingredients until crumbly, and
spread evenly over fruit mixture.
5. Bake for 30 minutes, then reduce oven temp to 350 to prevent overbrowning
and continue baking 30-45 more minutes. It's done when apples are fork
tender and topping is deep golden brown.
NOTE: If desired you can make a single recipe of pastry crust and line the
pan with it prior to adding fruit.

Enjoy :-)

kimberly


  #15 (permalink)  
Old 18-08-2004, 10:26 PM
Nexis
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Peter Werner" wrote in message
m...
I have a surplus of apples and want to make several apple crisps -
baked sweetened apples with a crumb topping made with butter, sugar,
flour, and oatmeal. Something along these lines:

http://pie.allrecipes.com/az/AppleCrispIV.asp

albeit with a little bit of tapioca added so that the juice exuded by
the apples thickens.

The question I have concerns freezing them - I want to freeze several
of the crisps for later enjoyment. Is there any problem with baking
them, freezing them after they've cooled, then using a microwave to
thaw them later? Should I freeze them partially baked or unbaked and
bake them when I'm ready to unfreeze them?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Peter



If you freeze them baked, then microwave them they may have decent flavor,
but the crisp portion will be soggy goo. It's better to prepare them, just
as if you were going to bake them, then freeze. When you're ready to enjoy,
just take it directly from freezer to oven (don't thaw first) and increase
your baking time accordingly. Check on it when it's been about time and 1/2
as usual, and go from there. After the first time you'll know just how long
to bake it.
Here's my two favorite crisp recipes for your consideration ;-)

For A Crowd Apple Crisp
This is a good size recipe, baked in a 9x13x2" pan.
Ingredients
10 cups thinly sliced apples
1/4 to 1 cup white sugar (Depends greatly on variety of apple and desired
level of sweetness)
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground nutmeg
1/2 cup water spiked with 2 tsp lemon juice
Topping:
2 cup quick-cooking oats
2 cup all-purpose flour
2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 tsp good cinnamon (I like Penzey's Vietnamese Cinnamon for this)
1 cup butter, melted

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degree C).
2. Place the sliced apples in a 9x13 inch pan. Combine sugar, 1 tablespoon
flour and ground cinnamon and nutmeg together, and sprinkle over
apples.Toss lightly. Pour lemon water evenly over the apples.
3. Combine the oats, flour, brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda,
cinnamon and melted butter together. Should be crumbly, but not too dry or
too wet. Crumble evenly over the apple mixture.
4. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for about 45 minutes. It's done
when the topping is a deep golden color and the apples are fork tender.
5. Serve with cinnamon ice cream, vanilla ice cream, or just whipped cream.
NOTE: A very nice addition to this is to add some slivered or chopped
almonds, about 1/2 cup, to the crisp topping before putting atop the apples.
You can also add 1/2 tsp almond extract to filling.

Julian Mountain Berry Apple Pie
I adapt this recipe to make a crisp at times, though I do like it with the
pastry crust as well. Make it in a deep dish pie pan.

2 1/2 pounds apples, peeled, cored, sliced (Macintosh or Idared are really
good in
this recipe)
2 cups berries: blackberries, raspberries, boysenberries and strawberries in
any combo
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
2 tablespoons flour
1 tablespoon butter
Topping:
1 1/4 cups flour
1/2 c toasted oats
1 1/2 cups brown sugar
1 cup chopped almonds (may use pecans)
3/4 cup cold butter

Directions:
1. Heat oven to 375 degrees F
2. Toss together the apples, 2 tbsp flour, cinnamon, sugar, and nutmeg.
Carefully add in berries.
3. Butter your deep sided pie dish and add the filling to it.
4. Cut cold butter into remaining topping ingredients until crumbly, and
spread evenly over fruit mixture.
5. Bake for 30 minutes, then reduce oven temp to 350 to prevent overbrowning
and continue baking 30-45 more minutes. It's done when apples are fork
tender and topping is deep golden brown.
NOTE: If desired you can make a single recipe of pastry crust and line the
pan with it prior to adding fruit.

Enjoy :-)

kimberly


 




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