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Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Substitute for fresh/frozen cranberries



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2003, 06:45 PM
Suanne Wong
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Substitute for fresh/frozen cranberries

The following cranberry cookies calls for 2 1/2 cups of cranberries (I
assummed it's asking for fresh ones). Can I substitute it with dried ones
and how much would it be?

Thanks,
Sue

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1/2 cup butter
1 cup sugar
3/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup milk
2 tablespoons orange juice
1 egg
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup chopped walnuts
2 1/2 cups coarsely chopped cranberries

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Cream butter and both sugars.
Stir in milk, juice and egg.
Mix in dry ingredients and mix well.
Stir in nuts and cranberries.
Drop dough by teaspoon about 2" apart on greased baking sheet.
Bake 10-15 minutes. Makes 11 dozen.



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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2003, 11:54 PM
Jim Lahue
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Substitute for fresh/frozen cranberries

If I were using dried cranberries, I'd reconstitute them first and then
use them 1-to-1 in place of the fresh/frozen cranberries.

Jim Lahue


Suanne Wong wrote:
The following cranberry cookies calls for 2 1/2 cups of cranberries (I
assummed it's asking for fresh ones). Can I substitute it with dried ones
and how much would it be?

Thanks,
Sue

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1/2 cup butter
1 cup sugar
3/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup milk
2 tablespoons orange juice
1 egg
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup chopped walnuts
2 1/2 cups coarsely chopped cranberries

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Cream butter and both sugars.
Stir in milk, juice and egg.
Mix in dry ingredients and mix well.
Stir in nuts and cranberries.
Drop dough by teaspoon about 2" apart on greased baking sheet.
Bake 10-15 minutes. Makes 11 dozen.




  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2003, 01:05 AM
H. W. Hans Kuntze
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Substitute for fresh/frozen cranberries

Suanne Wong wrote:

The following cranberry cookies calls for 2 1/2 cups of cranberries (I
assummed it's asking for fresh ones). Can I substitute it with dried on=

es

Yes Susan. They are excellent dried.

and how much would it be?

Basically 3 - 1, fresh/dried, but I would not worry about that too much, =

just put in as much as you think feels right, they are not going to=20
upset a thing. Much like raisins. Matter of fact, they are dried much=20
better than fresh. Same as cherries in cookies.

But I would toast the nuts before chopping, much better flavor.

You might want to chuck the baking soda too, although there is some acid =

from the O-J and brown sugar, the acid from the fresh cranberries will=20
be missing to activate it.
Substitute another 3/4 to 1 ts of baking powder instead.

--=20
Sincerly,

C=3D=A6-)=A7 H. W. Hans Kuntze, CMC, S.g.K. (_o_)
http://www.cmcchef.com , chefATcmcchef.com
"Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it Happened"
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/=20

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2003, 04:07 AM
Dee Randall
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Substitute for fresh/frozen cranberries



You might want to chuck the baking soda too, although there is some acid
from the O-J and brown sugar, the acid from the fresh cranberries will
be missing to activate it.
Substitute another 3/4 to 1 ts of baking powder instead.

I'll never understand the principles of using 1) baking soda only 2) baking
powder only 3) both baking soda and baking powder in equal amounts and 4)
both baking soda and baking powder in different amounts. Can you give me
(us) an easily understood lesson/explanation.

The only thing I know about is adding a tablespoon of vinegar to milk to
make it buttermilk -- this is about as far as my understanding of acid
goes --

thanks so much,
Dee




"H. W. Hans Kuntze" wrote in message
...
Suanne Wong wrote:

The following cranberry cookies calls for 2 1/2 cups of cranberries (I
assummed it's asking for fresh ones). Can I substitute it with dried ones

Yes Susan. They are excellent dried.

and how much would it be?

Basically 3 - 1, fresh/dried, but I would not worry about that too much,
just put in as much as you think feels right, they are not going to
upset a thing. Much like raisins. Matter of fact, they are dried much
better than fresh. Same as cherries in cookies.

But I would toast the nuts before chopping, much better flavor.

You might want to chuck the baking soda too, although there is some acid
from the O-J and brown sugar, the acid from the fresh cranberries will
be missing to activate it.
Substitute another 3/4 to 1 ts of baking powder instead.

--
Sincerly,

C=-) H. W. Hans Kuntze, CMC, S.g.K. (_o_)
http://www.cmcchef.com , chefATcmcchef.com
"Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it Happened"
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2003, 04:37 AM
H. W. Hans Kuntze
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Substitute for fresh/frozen cranberries

Dee Randall wrote:


You might want to chuck the baking soda too, although there is some acid=


from the O-J and brown sugar, the acid from the fresh cranberries will
be missing to activate it.
Substitute another 3/4 to 1 ts of baking powder instead.

I'll never understand the principles of using 1) baking soda only 2) ba=

king
powder only 3) both baking soda and baking powder in equal amounts and=

4)
both baking soda and baking powder in different amounts. Can you give m=

e
(us) an easily understood lesson/explanation.

The only thing I know about is adding a tablespoon of vinegar to milk to=


make it buttermilk -- this is about as far as my understanding of acid
goes --=20

Thats as easy as I can make it Dee, hope it helps.
All you have to think about is, you want to develop gas/CO2/ and that is =

done to leaven the product, make it lighter.
With yeast, the bacteria do it, with baking soda (Natron), the acid does =
it.
Just take a TB of Arm&Hammer baking soda and add a ts of vinegar and you =

will see, foaming and gas.
If you want to go further, take another TB of Soda and add a ts of water =

and you will see what happens, nothing.

Usually, baking powder is 2-3 parts of powdered acid/salts (cream of=20
tartar, etc.) and one part of soda. You substitute 3 ts of baking powder =

for 1 ts of soda, if you have enough acid in your batter to create a=20
reaction.

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D REZKONV-Rezept - RezkonvSuite v0.96f

Titel: LEAVENING AGENTS
Kategorien: Info, Baking
Menge: 1 Jede Menge

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3 D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D QUELLE =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3 D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
-Erfasst *RK* 17.02.03 von
-H.W. Hans Kuntze, CMC

CLASSIFICATION:

There are two types of leavening agents available.

1. Chemical leavening agents.

2. Yeast.

CHEMICAL LEAVENERS

1. Baking powder

2. Baking Soda

3. Ammonium Carbonate

BAKING POWDER:

A mixture of crystallized acid or sour salts and baking soda.
Usually in the proportions of 2 to 1 with a small amount of starch
added to prevent caking and a premature release of the gases.

When heat and moisture are present, the acid will react as a
catalysator for the baking soda, thereby releasing carbon dioxide.
This gas works its way into existing air cells in the batter that
were formed through creaming, expands them and thereby increasing
the volume of the product. As more heat acts upon the batter, it
will set with a fluffy texture.

CREAM OF TARTAR

Cream of Tartar is refined acid that is left as a crystallized
substance when fermenting grape juice for wine. Usually sold in
powder form, it is white and has a slightly acidic taste. By itself,
it can be used to increase the volume when whipping egg whites.
Mixed with baking soda it becomes a leavening agent.

BAKING SODA:

Contains carbon and oxygen. that when acted upon by an acid in
presence of moisture and heat, will form carbon dioxide gas. If the
batter has sufficient amounts of acidity coming from other
ingredients such as lemon juice, molasses, etc. it can be used as
leavening agent by itself and will not need cream of tartar or sour
salt as a catalysator.

AMMONIUM CARBONATE

D=F6s not require an acid as a catalysator, but will release carbon
dioxide in the presence of heat and moisture. It will react very
quickly and is used for products where this sudden leavening is
desirable.

YEAST

There are two types of yeast used for baking.

1. COMPRESSED YEAST

2. ACTIVE DRY YEAST

COMPOSITION OF YEAST

Yeast is a one-celled plant and belongs to the family of fungi. It
multiplies by budding under ideal conditions once every twenty
minutes. The ideal conditions involve the presence of moisture, food
and an ideal temperature of 110 degrees F. During the budding
process, enzymes contained in the yeast act upon and break down
complex sugars into simple sugars and turning these simple sugars
into carbon dioxide (C02) and alcohol.

Enzymes responsible for this are INVERTASE and ZYMASE.

Heat and energy are formed, conditioning the batch of dough and
raising the heavy ma=DF into a light porous, elastic product that when
baked is easier to digest, more appetizing, more palatable.

In general, a loaf of bread, when baked without the help of yeast
would be flat and hard as a rock. Without the yeast, bread products
or other yeast raised products would not be possible.

Good compressed yeast should be purchased from a trusted
manufacturer. Uniform product and pureness are desirable. It should
have a firm, springy consistency, break and crumble clean. It should
have a fresh pleasant smell and taste and a light cream color.
Commercially it is available in one-pound blocks and should not be
allowed to get too old. If necessary it can be frozen.

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D

--=20
Sincerly,

C=3D=A6-)=A7 H. W. Hans Kuntze, CMC, S.g.K. (_o_)
http://www.cmcchef.com , chefATcmcchef.com
"Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it Happened"
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/=20

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2003, 06:32 AM
Static I
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Substitute for fresh/frozen cranberries

Asd your recipe contrasts the taste of orange and cranberries, how about using
an orange/raisin recipe and jusd use dried cranberries instead? I think it
should be great.

I found one with no trouble - I'm sure you could adapt any raisin cookie to
your purpose.

http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,181,1...224192,00.html

Cooks.com | Recipe | ORANGE RAISIN COOKIES
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2003, 06:35 PM
Suanne Wong
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Substitute for fresh/frozen cranberries

Thank you so much for all the informations.
Sue

"H. W. Hans Kuntze" wrote in message
...
Suanne Wong wrote:

The following cranberry cookies calls for 2 1/2 cups of cranberries (I
assummed it's asking for fresh ones). Can I substitute it with dried ones

Yes Susan. They are excellent dried.

and how much would it be?

Basically 3 - 1, fresh/dried, but I would not worry about that too much,
just put in as much as you think feels right, they are not going to
upset a thing. Much like raisins. Matter of fact, they are dried much
better than fresh. Same as cherries in cookies.

But I would toast the nuts before chopping, much better flavor.

You might want to chuck the baking soda too, although there is some acid
from the O-J and brown sugar, the acid from the fresh cranberries will
be missing to activate it.
Substitute another 3/4 to 1 ts of baking powder instead.

--
Sincerly,

C=-) H. W. Hans Kuntze, CMC, S.g.K. (_o_)
http://www.cmcchef.com , chefATcmcchef.com
"Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it Happened"
_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/


 




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