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Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

Why lower temps for non-stick pans?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 15-12-2006, 03:01 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 9
Default Why lower temps for non-stick pans?

Hi,

I bought a cake mix and noticed that the baking instructions were 30 mins at
350 degrees. It then said, "For darker or non-stick pans, bake at 325
degrees for 41-44 minutes." I've not seen this before.

Why do non-stick pans require a lower temperature for longer? What happens
if you don't adhere to those instructions? What is considered to be a
"darker pan?"

I usually bake from scratch and have never seen this before. I remember
there used to be different instructions for glass vs. metal pans, but never
for non-stick and darker pans.

Thanks so much,

Michelle


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 15-12-2006, 04:47 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 567
Default Why lower temps for non-stick pans?

On Thu, 14 Dec 2006 22:01:55 -0500, "Eddie G"
wrote:

I usually bake from scratch and have never seen this before. I remember
there used to be different instructions for glass vs. metal pans, but never
for non-stick and darker pans.


Every box cake mix I've seen for many years has specified a lower temperature
for dark pans. Check a few in your local grocery store.

-- Larry
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 15-12-2006, 01:55 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 9
Default Why lower temps for non-stick pans?


pltrgyst wrote:
On Thu, 14 Dec 2006 22:01:55 -0500, "Eddie G"
wrote:

I usually bake from scratch and have never seen this before. I remember
there used to be different instructions for glass vs. metal pans, but never
for non-stick and darker pans.


Every box cake mix I've seen for many years has specified a lower temperature
for dark pans. Check a few in your local grocery store.

-- Larry


Thanks, Larry, but do you know why?

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 15-12-2006, 03:00 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 506
Default Why lower temps for non-stick pans?

In article , "Eddie G"
says...
Hi,

I bought a cake mix and noticed that the baking instructions were 30 mins at
350 degrees. It then said, "For darker or non-stick pans, bake at 325
degrees for 41-44 minutes." I've not seen this before.

Why do non-stick pans require a lower temperature for longer? What happens
if you don't adhere to those instructions? What is considered to be a
"darker pan?"

I usually bake from scratch and have never seen this before. I remember
there used to be different instructions for glass vs. metal pans, but never
for non-stick and darker pans.

Thanks so much,

Michelle

I think the assumption is that pans that are dark or "non-stick" are
coated with something, with everything else assumed to be bare metal of
some sort. The manufacturer has probably determined through testing
that the heat transfer characteristics of a coated pan vs. bare metal
are different enough to warrant the different times and temps, to make
sure the middle of the cake is done before the bottom and sides become
overdone.

Bob
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 15-12-2006, 03:42 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 567
Default Why lower temps for non-stick pans?

On 15 Dec 2006 05:55:25 -0800, "Eddie G" wrote:

Every box cake mix I've seen for many years has specified a lower temperature
for dark pans. Check a few in your local grocery store.

Thanks, Larry, but do you know why?


I don't have a citation, but I assume it's because darker colors absorb more
heat, while lighter colors reflect heat. Thus you need to reduce the temperature
for dark colored pans to avoid over-browning the bottom and sides before the
entire cake is done.

OK, a quickie from http://www.dianasdesserts.com/: "Heavy dark metal pans,
nonstick pans, and glass pans absorb and hold more heat, resulting in heavy,
dark crusts."

-- Larry
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2006, 06:52 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 34
Default Why lower temps for non-stick pans?


pltrgyst wrote:
On 15 Dec 2006 05:55:25 -0800, "Eddie G" wrote:

Every box cake mix I've seen for many years has specified a lower temperature
for dark pans. Check a few in your local grocery store.

Thanks, Larry, but do you know why?


I don't have a citation, but I assume it's because darker colors absorb more
heat, while lighter colors reflect heat. Thus you need to reduce the temperature
for dark colored pans to avoid over-browning the bottom and sides before the
entire cake is done.

OK, a quickie from http://www.dianasdesserts.com/: "Heavy dark metal pans,
nonstick pans, and glass pans absorb and hold more heat, resulting in heavy,
dark crusts."

-- Larry


You might want to retake high school physics.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2006, 11:05 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 567
Default Why lower temps for non-stick pans?

On 17 Dec 2006 10:52:56 -0800, wrote:

Every box cake mix I've seen for many years has specified a lower temperature
for dark pans. Check a few in your local grocery store.

Thanks, Larry, but do you know why?


I don't have a citation, but I assume it's because darker colors absorb more
heat, while lighter colors reflect heat. Thus you need to reduce the temperature
for dark colored pans to avoid over-browning the bottom and sides before the
entire cake is done.

OK, a quickie from
http://www.dianasdesserts.com/: "Heavy dark metal pans,
nonstick pans, and glass pans absorb and hold more heat, resulting in heavy,
dark crusts."


You might want to retake high school physics.


Then why don't you explain it to us? And cover the topic of white versus black
cars as well, please. And white versus dark tennis clothing. Thanks.

-- Larry
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2006, 11:40 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 61
Default Why lower temps for non-stick pans?

pltrgyst wrote:
Then why don't you explain it to us? And cover the topic of white versus black
cars as well, please. And white versus dark tennis clothing. Thanks.


Maybe also explain why cricket is now played wearing coloured pyjamas g
--
Bruce Fletcher
Stronsay, Orkney
www.stronsay.co.uk/claremont
(Remove teeth to reply)
"Some days you are the pigeon. Some days you are the statue"
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 18-12-2006, 02:46 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Posts: 1,025
Default Why lower temps for non-stick pans?

Bruce wrote:
pltrgyst wrote:
Then why don't you explain it to us? And cover the topic of white
versus black
cars as well, please. And white versus dark tennis clothing. Thanks.


Maybe also explain why cricket is now played wearing coloured pyjamas g


Because they need to go directly to sleep after a game
(match? chukker? peloton?) since it's as deadly dull as it is.

A sure cure for insomnia.

I prefer curling.

No, seriously...

Pastorio
 




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